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Pak Tea House » Activism, Benazir Bhutto, Citizens, culture, Dance, Democracy, dynasties, Heritage, History, Identity, Islam, Islamism, magazines, Media, minorities, Pakistan, Politics, south asia, Travel, UAE, USA » Will India Accept Zardari’s Olive Branch?

Will India Accept Zardari’s Olive Branch?

President Zardari’s Peace formula for india and Pakistan

The PAKISTANI GOVERNMENT under President Zardari started peace initiatives with India taking tentative steps to liberalise Trade and tourism with India. Zardari send delegations comprising of Civil society SAFMA,PIPFPD and HRCP members for back-channel diplomacy with India after 26/11 terrorist attacks.  Zardari’s live webcast (his firstever) with english speaking Internet users in India and coining terms like “we are all half Indian/half Pakistani” was very optimistic.

In the period between 6 September presidential inauguration and 26/11 Mumbai terrorist attacks, Zardari administration  was still struggling in its initial days inside Pakistan with terrorist attacks on Marriot Hotel and the worsening law-and-order situation in the tribal belt and north west frontier province.There is a “made-in-Taliban” tag in the world media and it had already scared off most of the western tourists.

The only Fool-hardy  mountain climbers  are still going to Ismaili majority Northern Areas where extremist suicide bombers cannot have any Mass Appeal due to religious difference with Ismaili Shias. 

 

 

 However, the  peace initiative between India and Pakistan is a rare opportunity to rekindle thetorch of peace between India and Pakistan. the Indian leadership (barring Sonia and her son Rahul Gandhi) is in their old age of retirement  , hardly a material for pragmatic and dynamic leadership. The anti Pakistan lobby headed by fire breathing Parnab Mukherjee who the people of his own Bengal have rejected a number of times, fails to take the hint and quit gracefully and is joining hands with delusional Ms. Mamata Banerjee to win eleections. The Cambridge educated bureaucrate ManMohan singh sounds like a Punjabi supervisor from a Russian Tractor factory rather than an accomplished economist that he is acclaimed to be.

 The right-wing leadership in BJP Vajpai and Advani have become incontinent and cannot function properly. The young gun Varun Gandhi is the proverbial “Bull in a China Shop”.The younger Gandhi has a inferiority complex viz-a-vi Chrismatic and highly Popluar cousin Rahul Gandhi.Varun’s xenophobic and racist statements against muslims expose him as an attention-seeking spoiled brat of the dysfunctional branch of Nehru-Gandhi dynasty,as they “like father,like son”.

It is the young leadership of india (Sonia and Rahul) who can effectively  talk with youth Pakistani government( Zardari,Gillani,Taseer and Qureshi). The vigorous TV campaign for a Visit India on the European channels was highly successful in “incredible India” promoting Indian tourism and culture till 26/11 attacks when suddenly British and American got scared about indian tourism.

The Pakistan government initiatives — we have learned through previous experiences of Visit Pakistan Year 2007  which went up in smoke of chief justice movement and terrorist attacks after of red mosque siege — are most of the time riddled with bureaucratic red tape, half-hearted, half-baked and ill-conceived  tourism departments.

Nevertheless, Zardari made a start, which every one thought might bring better results this time around, but  It wasn’t to be.the Hawks in Indian and Pakistani establishment and media started talking of Terrorism rather than Tourism and dark clouds of war started gathering over the whole subcontinent ,thankfully the sane leadership of India(Sonia & Manmohan) and Pakistan(Zardari,Gillani,Taseer and Qureshi) saved the countries from the brink of war.

 

 

There are a few silver linings appearing on even the darkest of clouds.Tourism today is one of the biggest industries in the world; it brings employment, opportunities and equality to otherwise less-developed areas in India such as Rajasthan. The Terrorist attacks came at a worst time for tourist industry in India when the tourist season was just starting after hot monsoon season.

 Pakistan is the best-kept secret of tourism industry.after the 9/11 and afghan war Pakistan became a dangerous destination for western tourists. The Himalayan valleys in northern areas, The Kite runner Festivals of “Basant” in the ancient walled inner city of Lahore(capital of north indian culture), Pakistan cultural and religious tourism for sikh religion and sufi shrines and  K-2 mountain climbers disappeared from the tourism industry radar , thease are still as good as any in the world. Pakistan has to showcase the Indus Valley and Ghandhara Buddhist civilizations, Basant festival, performing arts festival, truck art, chicken-tikka masaala cuisine, Buddhist, Hindu and Sikh pilgrimage places to new markets.

The Peace tourism discussion is about how ordinary Pakistanis and Indians can play a part in defining what is meant by  new friendship initiative. The Pakistani government focused on cultural exchanges, peace cricket tours with India (which was cancelled by Indian  hawks in their war  posturing), festivals at Shiv Mandir in Katas Raj and Kali Mandir in Hinglaj Balouchistan. Also, religious tourism, if opened, can bring Non-resident Indians(sikhs especially) NRIs from Europe and America. Its high time Indians are allowed free access to Pakistani destinations.

 Most of the Indian Citizens are not scared of terrorism threats that world media projects about Pakistan. They know that most of Pakistan (and india as well )is a peaceful destination and the people are friendly and are nostalgic about the communal harmony in pre-partition days from British india.

 Entry visas at arrival for business, family and package tourists will be the first right step in normalising the peace process and increasing people-to-people contacts between the two countries.

Millions of Indians will be eager to cross the Wagha border for a day trips to savour the culinary delights of Lahore food street and Basant and other Punjabi festivals. This nostalgia and the bond of friendship was shown in Indian cricket tour of Pakistan 2004 when thousands of passionate Indian cricket fans turned Pakistan tour into a festive occasion and places like Peshawar (northern NWFP capital), the birth place of Dilip Kumar and Raj Kapoor and the family home of Shah Rukh Khan, welcomed Indians with open hearts.

 Everyone have their own ideas on South Asian future and identity, there are right and left wing views on secular, religious, urban and rural commoners and elites population diversities. Pakistan is a multi-cultural, multi-lingual, multi-religious society, which can fosters the concept of “unity in diversity” and “peace for friendship”, and this must be the key to “tourism for peace”. Pakistani tourism must focus on commonalities between the two countries so that Pakistani destinations become a permanent spot on the Indian tourism map.

Most Indians still have historical links with families, festivals, cities, food, culture, music and art of Pakistan. Pakistan can make it a year-long campaign. Institutions like PIA, already flying to Delhi and Mumbai, can become a calling card for Pakistani tourism and hospitality by increasing the number of flights to Indian cities. Private airlines from India and Pakistan can also share the frequencies in domestic network.

 The shipping industry in both countries has already joined hands to promote trade and tourism. The  indian government terrorism assessment  after 26/11can damage sea links between Mumbai-karachi.

State-run Pakistan TV and Dordarshan India should be allowed mutual reach in Pakistan ,India and Middle East,  Organisations like south asian free media association (SAFMA)and Pakistan India Peoples Forum for Peace and Democracy (PIPFPD)can spearhead the peace campaign. Major Pakistani satellite channels like Dawn TV, Indus Group, ARY, Geo and Jang. AAJ TV are already collaborating with Indian film and media industry to bridge the gaps between two Countries.Will india receiprocate the Zardari peace intiatives remains to be seen.
If Indians and Pakistanis decide to take ‘peace intiative” Western will surely follow indian and pakistan tourism

Bradistan Calling is a Pakistani Website  in Bradford,UK (Little Pakistan).This Article appears courtesy of Pakistan Spectator Magazine.





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19 Responses to "Will India Accept Zardari’s Olive Branch?"

  1. lal India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    I am in general agreement with the mood of the article.But for all practical purpose any process can start only after the elections and the constituents of the ruling combine becomes clearer.It could be much better if it could be combined with other measures like the trial of people involved in mumbai carnage.
    about the depicition of pranab mukharji in the article,it will suffice to say that the author has got all his facts wrong.he is in fact the only congress leader respected by both bjp and communists.

    …’Most of the Indian Citizens are not scared of terrorism threats that world media projects about Pakistan. They know that most of Pakistan (and india as well )is a peaceful destination and the people are friendly and are nostalgic about the communal harmony in pre-partition days from British india…..
    as we all know that is not the perception of pakistan in indian minds,whatever the reality.

    i am equally cynical about the role of doordarshan,ptv,pia and many other specific points raised in the post,but dont want to malign a positive intention with sarcastic comments.all the best for peace tourism

  2. [...] herbcotton.org added an interesting post today on Will India Accept Zardariâ [...]

  3. lal India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    ”…..peace cricket tours with India (which was cancelled by Indian hawks in their war posturing)…..”
    isnt it a case of selective amnesia.he wanted the indian cricket team there instead of srilanka or what?talking of that ,what happened to our al-qaeda raw article.dustbinned?no follow up articles,no revealation from the sources that pth have in government,kya hua bhayya :)

  4. Moral of the Story “There is light at the end of tunnel”.
    I am sure we all agree that its People to people LOVE which will confront the DEVIL OF HATRED

    The Pakistani-Indian people to people friendship society PIPFPD started its work nearly two decades ago, when the Pak-Indian subcontinent was under dark clouds of war hysteria and animosity. Thinking back, those times seem a century rather than a decade back. Pakistani and Indian actors, musicians, journalists, business people and human rights activists made this venture such a resounding success that the politicians, on both sides, had to follow in their foot steps.

  5. lal India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    Actually one indian commentator which surprised and impressed me was mahesh bhatt.when after mumbai,even the holiest of peacenicks were hiding from the harsh questions that indian media was putting up,he was very clear that peace must go on, mumbai or no mumbai.

  6. Panchi Pavan Hava kay Jonkay
    Koi Sarhad naa annay Rookay
    Sarhad Insanoo kay liyay hai
    Soocho Kaya Paya Hum nay Insan Hoo Kay

    roughly Translated
    “No Border can stop Birds,Rain clouds and Fresh Air

    Borders are for Human facility and humans are not Slave to borders, Think about it”

    Song from Bollywood Movie Refugee

  7. Milind Kher India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    If more and more people start speaking up, we can positively give peace a chance.

    The first thing we need is for the terrorists to be chased out so that we can start playing cricket again. Indo Pak beats the Ashes anyday..

  8. Majumdar India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    Milind babu,

    Indo Pak beats the Ashes anyday..

    Sadly that is not true any more. Few Indians even bother celebrating an Indian win over Pak these days.

    The bete noire is Australia these days.

    Regards

  9. Rex United Arab Emirates Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    Abt sane leadership in india averting war, i really dont find Sonia playing a big role there. In fact pranab did a good job, is my opinion.this almost seems like an article trying to promote Sonia and rahul. other issues are jus there to add meat.

    Abt cricket, a high profile, widely telecasted event is just what the terrorists want. Do we have to play in to their hands just to prove a point?

    As for peace process, remember a poetry-obsessed-slightly-deluded ex-PM of india making peace overtures (by way of bus/train/whatever)all the while when pakistani troops posed as tribals were taking up posts high up in the mountains? Peace talks must start, but india has to remain vigilant at its borders. Eternal vigilance is the price n all that…

  10. pulipati sai India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    This is a very matured and pragmatic writeup.
    The people of India are starving to have good relations and visits with Pakistan. Both the countries are belong to the same family but living in separate houses.
    The people of India are peace loving and they live with all harmony with all people of varied religions. Religion does not matter for brotherhood.
    Enough is enough. Atleast let the next generation youngesters does not develop hatred if not love.

    To encourage them in that direction more visits between Lahore and Amritsar be organised as conducted tours. This will initiate as a good spring boat to develop understanding and seeing the reality of the otherside which were otherwise having distarted versions.

  11. PMA United States Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    “we are all half Indian/half Pakistani”

    What a clown that Zardari is. No self respect.

  12. PMA United States Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    “Peace talks must start, but india has to remain vigilant at its borders. Eternal vigilance is the price n all that…”

    My sentiments exactly. Pakistan must be vigilant at all time of every Indian move. May that be at her eastern border or at her western border.

    “Both the countries are belong to the same family but living in separate houses.”

    Thanks God for the ‘separate houses’. And ‘same family’ business is nothing but hogwash.

    “The people of India are peace loving and they live with all harmony with all people of varied religions.”

    Except every so often Hindus of India would like to kill Muslims among them like street dogs.

    “No Border can stop Birds,Rain clouds and Fresh Air”

    Except citizens of a country are neither birds, nor rain, nor clouds, nor air. The song is all about cheap sentiments. Borders are there to protect citizens from external hostilities. There must always be a strong international border between India and Pakistan for regional peace.

  13. Milind Kher India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    “There must always be a strong international border between India and Pakistan for regional peace.”

    As the Holy Prophet (SAWA) said, “Trust in God, but tie your camel”.

  14. Desi-MBA United Kingdom Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    why not have Economic Free Zone on Lahore Amritsar Border with IT and technology industries for both countries like Dubai or china economic zones

  15. lal India Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    man they r nt giving us even a rudimentary MFN status…and u r talking of SEZ

  16. dilnawaz United Kingdom Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    lets keep the torch of peace burning thru love and friendship. I am encouraged by your responses on my article.
    Lalu jee and Zardari Jee will listen to us eventually,well both are peaceniks anyway

  17. carlos United Kingdom Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    isn’t this all a bit fanciful, i mean enemies of 60 years, brothers? keep on dreaming Mr.

  18. Cynics will always be cynics. I believe in Hope. Thanks and end of Debate.

  19. N.Singh Uganda Unknow Browser Unknow Os says:

    Same people in 12th century and after 1947 and in 21th century differences increasing

    go through this article now and then

    Punjab, Rajput

    The Hon. Major General Nawab Malik Umar Hayat KhanTiwana as an Honorary Lieutenant of the 18th King George’s Own Lancers, early 20th century (watercolour by Major A.C. Lovett (1862-1919)
    According to the 1901 Census of India, the total Rajputs population in the Punjab was 1,798,000.[1], of which 1,347,000 (75%) were Muslim, the remainder being largely Hindu. Traditionally, in the plains of Punjab, most of the Rajput clans had converted to Islam and some Rajput villages in the Punjab Region converted, wholly or partially, to Sikhism. The extent of conversion depended on the influence of Sikhism in that region. while those of Punjab hills (modern Himachal Pradesh) remained Hindu.[2]
    Rajputs are the highly dominant and renowned royal warrior of Punjab region. The members of Punjabi Rajput tribes are landowners, businessmen and they play an active role in politics, army and bureaucracy.
    Under the British Raj of India, they were designated as a Martial Race [3] and provided strong numbers to the British Indian Army and fought in both World Wars.
    The Punjabi Rajput tribes possesses a strong Martial Reputation, and have produced many highly decorated and award winning Military Generals and Officers to the Pakistan Army and Indian Army.
    Contents
    [hide]
    • 1 Geography
    • 2 Martial traditions
    o 2.1 Top military awards
    o 2.2 Nishan-e-Haider
    • 3 Royal Titles used by the Punjabi Rajputs
    • 4 Major Muslim Rajput clans of Punjab
    • 5 List of Muslim Rajput clans from 1911 Census of India
    o 5.1 Rawalpindi District
    o 5.2 Attock District
    o 5.3 Jhelum District
    o 5.4 Gujrat District
    o 5.5 Shahpur District (Sargodha District)
    o 5.6 Mianwali District
    o 5.7 Lahore District
    o 5.8 Gujranwala District
    o 5.9 Amritsar District
    o 5.10 Sialkot District
    o 5.11 Motgomery District (Sahiwal District)
    o 5.12 Gurdaspur District
    o 5.13 Multan District
    o 5.14 Muzaffargarh District
    o 5.15 Jhang District
    o 5.16 Lyalpur District (Faisalabad District)
    o 5.17 Dera Ghazi Khan District
    o 5.18 Bahawalpur State
    o 5.19 Firozpur District
    o 5.20 Faridkot State
    o 5.21 Jalandhar District
    o 5.22 Ludhiana District
    o 5.23 Malerkotla State
    o 5.24 Kangra District
    o 5.25 Hoshiarpur District
    o 5.26 Patiala State
    o 5.27 Jind State
    o 5.28 Nabha State
    o 5.29 Ambala District
    o 5.30 Rohtak District
    o 5.31 Karnal District
    o 5.32 Gurgaon District
    o 5.33 Hissar District
    • 6 Hindu Rajputs of Punjab
    o 6.1 Hindu Rajputs of the Jammu Border or the Duggar
    o 6.2 Rajputs of the Eastern Hills
    • 7 Major clans of Hindu Rajputs of Punjab
    • 8 Sikh Rajputs
    o 8.1 Sikh Rajputs Diaspora
    o 8.2 Sikh Rajput Clans
    o 8.3 Sikh Rajputs in Khalsa
    • 9 Prominent Punjabi Rajputs
    • 10 See also
    • 11 References
    • 12 External links

    Geography

    Punjab (British India), 1909
    Punjab region straddling the border between India and Pakistan. The “Five Rivers” are the Beas, the Ravi, the Sutlej, the Chenab and the Jhelum. All are tributaries of the Indus river, the Jhelum being the largest. Punjab has a long history and rich cultural heritage. The people of the Punjab are called Punjabis and their language is also called Punjabi. The main religions of the Punjab region are, in order of population, Islam, Sikhism and Hinduism.
    Punjabi Rajputs are spread throughout Punjab Region in India and Pakistan. Muslim Punjabi Rajputs reside in Pakistani Punjab while Hindu Punjabi Rajputs reside in the Indian states of Himachal Pradesh and Indian Punjab, Sikh Punjabi Rajputs, mainly inhabit Punjab (India). In 1947, during the partition of India, almost all the Muslim Punjabi Rajputs found in India moved to Pakistan while Hindu and Sikh Rajputs moved to India.
    [edit] Martial traditions

    Tikka Khan was Pakistan’s Chief of Army Staff from 3 March, 1972 to 1 March, 1976.
    The Punjabi Rajputs has a long martial tradition which has continued into modern times. Punjabi Rajputs, being recognised in history as the warrior aristocracy, prior to this they were designated by the British Empire as a Martial Race and recruited into the Imperial Army. Muslim Rajputs naturally engaged in the Pakistani military in strong numbers, reaching ranks of Generals and the highest grade of Chief of Staff such as 7th Chief of Army Staff General Tikka Khan, Narma, Rajput and the 10th Chief of Army Satff General Asif Nawaz Khan Janjua.
    Some of the most respected officers of the Pakistan Army including its first General, PA 1, Muhammed Akbar Khan(Order of the British Empire), PA 2 General Muhammad Iftikhar Khan(designated to become the first C-in-C, but died in an aircrash), PA 12 Brig.General Muhammed Zafar(first Indian to become Commander of Cavalary) and PA 48 General Muhammad Anwar Khan (Pakistan’s first E-in-C) all hail from this clan. General Anwar is considered the father of Pakistan’s Corps of Engineers, and also served as Chairman OGDC.
    [edit] Top military awards

    Daily Mirror Khudadad Khan was awarded Victoria Cross, the first native Indian to receive this honour
    Members of Punjabi Rajput tribes have the honour of receiving top military awards both in British India and in Pakistan. Khudadad Khan VC (20 October 1888 – 8 March 1971) was the first Indian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest military award for gallantry in the face of the enemy given to British and Commonwealth forces. He was the first native-born Indian to win the Victoria Cross.
    On 31 October 1914, at Hollebeke, Belgium, 26-year old Khan performed an act of bravery for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross during the First World War.
    [edit] Nishan-e-Haider
    Five out of ten belongs to Punjabi Rajput clans was awarded Pakistan’s top military honour, the Nishan-E-Haider .
    • Muhammad Sarwar Shaheed Bhatti
    • Sawar Muhammad Hussain Shaheed Janjua
    • Major Raja Aziz Bhatti Shaheed
    • Rashid Minhas Shaheed Minhas
    • Major Shabbir Sharif Shaheed Nishan-e-Haider

    Captain Muhammad Sarwar Shaheed

    Major Aziz Bhatti Shaheed

    Pilot Officer Rashid Minhas Shaheed

    Major Shabbir Sharif Shaheed

    Jawan Sawar Muhammad Hussain Shaheed

    Royal Titles used by the Punjabi Rajputs
    Majority of Punjabi Rajputs use their ancient Royal titles such as Raja, Rana, Rao and Rai. All these titles are originated from the ancient Sanskrit word Rajanya.
    Many Punjabi Rajputs were also conferred titles by the Delhi Sultans and the Mughal Emperors such as Malik (Royal, King), Nawab ( Provincial Governor), Sirdar (Chief), Khan, Chaudhry, Mian, Mirza (Royal prince) and Sheikh (elder of the tribe).
    • Raja:
    Most members of the Punjabi Rajput clans use the title ‘Raja’ as this title was used by most of the Rajput rulers from ancient times.
    • Rana:
    Rana is a princely title of Royalty. Muslim Rajputs in Pakistan mainly in Lahore, Sheikhupura, Gujranwala and Sialkot use the title of Rana.
    • Rao:
    The majority of Raos in Pakistan are Muslim Punwar (Pawar) Rajputs. Raos can be found all across Pakistan and are found in large numbers in the Punjab Province. Raos are the brave people of the country as the majority of Raos are in Army forces of Pakistan.
    • Rai:
    Rai was a title of honor for certain Rajput rulers. The title today is found mostly in the Pakistani province of Punjab.
    • Chaudhry:
    This title was conferred upon the Muslim Minhas Rajputs of Dhanni(present day Chakwal) by the Mughal King, Zaheerudin Babur. However, during Maharaja Ranjeet Singh’s era, the title lost its exclusivity as the Maharaja gave this title to all the village-heads around Punjab. Ever since, the Chaudhrys of Chakwal style themselves as Chaudhrials to distinguish themselves from the newly appointed men.
    • Sirdar:
    This title is manily used by the Sikh Minhas Rajputs. However, lately some Muslim Minhas Rajput clans in Azad Jammu & Kashmir and Punjab Sialkot & Chakwal have also started using this title due to various reasons.
    • Sheikh
    Many Rajput clans had converted to Islam during the early 12th century and were given the honorary title of Sheikh (elder of the tribe) by their Arab rulers.Sheiukh rajputs were the earliest in Rajputs to embrace Islam.
    • Khan:
    Mulsim Mair Minhas Rajput use the title of Khan. Raja Bhagir Dev was named Muhammed Mair after conversion to Islam and his descendants as Mair-Minhas Rajputs. Most of Muslim Mair Minhas use the title of Khan.
    • Mian:
    This title was conferred upon the ‘Punjab Hill Chiefs’ by the Mughal King, Jhangir and was used by most of the Rajput tribes in the Punjab Hills for many centuries. The elder brother was called Raja, whereas his younger brothers were called Mian. Lately, the Rajputs have decided to use ‘Thakur’ instead of this Mughal title.

    Major Muslim Rajput clans of Punjab

    General Muhammed Akbar Khan belonged to the famous Mair-Minhas Rajput tribe of Chakwal

    International Cricketer Sajid Mahmood, a Janjua Rajput from Raja Kala Khan of Maira Matore, Rawalpindi.
    The Rajputs clans that had converted to Islam were found throughout the old province of Punjab. The Pothohar region was seen as a stronghold of the Muslim Rajputs mainly Janjua and Minhas. Essentialy, the Muslim Rajputs were divided into three groups, those found in the north west, those of the central, who by and large belonged to seven tribes, namely, the Khokhar, Bhatti, Chauhan, Ghorewaha, Manj, Naru and Parmar (Panwhar), and finally the Ranghar of modern Haryana. Here is a brief description of the major Punjabi Rajput clans found in Pakistani Punjab:
    Alpial
    The Alpial clan is found mainly in Fateh Jang Tehsil of Attock District. The Alpial are a clan of the Manj Rajputs. The Alpials use the title Chawdhary.
    Baghela
    The Baghela are a Suryavanshi clan of Rajputs. In Punjab, they occupy a few villages in Kamalia. The use the title Mehr.
    Baghial
    The Baghial clan is found mainly in Rawalpindi District. They are a clan of the Parmara Rajputs. The use the title Raja.
    Bais
    The Bais or more so pronounced Bhains in the local Punjabi are a clan Suryavanshi Rajputs. They are found normally in the northern areas of both sides of Punjab.
    Bangial
    The Bangial are tribe found mainly in the Potohar region of Punjab and also in the Mirpur District of Azad Kashmir . Those of Rawalpindi District consider themselves Rajputs, while those in Jhelum and Gujrat consider themselves as Jats. This not uncommon in the Potohar region. The Rajput branch uses the title Raja. In addition to those in the Potohar region, the Bangial tribe is also found in Thal desert, especially Darya Khan in Bhakkar District. These use the title Malik. The Bangial are a clan of the Parmara Rajputs.
    Bargujar
    There are two Muslim branches of the Bargujar clan, one of which was found in the Gurgaon District, in modern Haryana. After the partition of British India in 1947, these Bargujar settled in Okara and Sahiwal District. They use the title Rao. Another Muslim branch, which remains in India are the Lalkhanis of Aligarh District in Uttar Pradesh, to which belongs the famous family of the Nawabs of Chathari.

    Bersal.
    The Bersal are a Suryavanshi clan, and were Rajas of Kashmir and Kangra. The Hindu branch provided the Maharajas of Jammu and Kashmir. Prior to partition, the districts of Gurdaspur,kangra,Chamba,and Jammu & Kashmir were home to a large number of Muslim Bersal. In what became Pakistani territory, they were and are found in numbers in Sialkot, Gujranwala, Lahore,Sahiwal and Rawalpindi districts, which all bordered Jammu and Kashmir. The Bersal were close relatives of Pathania Rajputs of Gurdaspur. The Bersal are Use Raja,Rana,Chauhdary and Mian as a title.
    Bhachar
    The Bhachar are a clan of Khokhar Rajputs, found mainly in in and around the town of Wan Bhachran in Mianwali District. They use the title Malik.
    Bhakral
    The Bhakral are found in the Potohar region, in Jhelum and Rawalpindi Districts. They claim to be a clan of the Parmara Rajputs. Like all Potohar Rajputs, they use the title Raja.
    Bhao
    The Bhao are found in Gujrat District of Punjab,and Bhimber District of Azad Kashmir. The Bhao are Dogras, and are a clan of the Raghbansi Rajputs. Like the Chibs, whom they closely resemble, the use Raja as title.
    Bharat
    The Bharat are a Suryavanshi Rajput clan. They are found in Pind Dadan Khan Tehsil of Jhelum District. Some historians consider them to last remnants of the ancient clan of the Bharatas, the clan of the Pandav. They use the title Raja.
    Bhatti
    The largest Rajput tribe in the Punjab, found in every district of that province. They are a Chandravanshi clan, claim descent from Krishna. Prior to the partition of India, the Bhatti were found in almost all the districts of the British province, barring the extreme south east. Many other clans such as the Sidhu Jats, among other claim Bhatti descent. Those of Potohar use the title Raja, those from Jallandhar and Ludhiana use the title Rai, while those of Pindi Bhattian use the title Chawdhary.
    Bhutta
    Found in south west Punjab, especially atround Multan, the Bhutta are a Suryavanshi clan. They use the title Malik. They should not be confused with the Bhutta clan of the Arain tribe, which is entirely distinct.
    Chadhar
    The Chadhar are a Parmara clan, and found through out southern Punjab. The Jhang Chadhars call themselves Rajputs, and use the title Malik. But the Chadhars of Gujranwala, Sargodha and Jhelum consider themselves to be Jat.;Chattar
    Chattar
    A very small population of Chattaris are found in Pakistani Punjab and Azad Kashmir. After embracing Islam, the Chattar use the titles of Sheikh,Malik or Raja.Chattars of Jammu region are classified as Dogra Rajputs.

    Chandel
    The Chandel are a Chandravanshi clan, historically found in the Doaba and Malwa regions of Indian Punjab. Like other East Punjab clans, they emigrated to Pakistan after partition. The use the title Rana.
    Chauhan
    The Chauhan are a widespread clan, and together with Parmar, come from the Agnivanshi branch of the Rajputs. The Chauhans were also one of the main clans of the old Punjab, who had almost entirely converted to Islam. There were only a few Hindu villages left in the Gurgaon District.
    The Chauhans of the Potohar region, where they are found in Attock, Rawalpindi and Jhelum use the title Raja. The Chauhans of Lahore, as well as those once settled in Amritsar and Jallandhar use the title Rana. The Chauhans are formed the main element of the Ranghar of Haryana. Like other Haryana Muslims, they emigrated to Pakistan. They use the title Rao.

    Chib
    The Chib are a clan of the Katoch Rajputs of Kangra, and are Dogras. They are found in the Kharian Tehsil of Gujrat District, and just above Jhelum city in the Jhelum District. Like other Rajputs of the region, they use Raja as their title.
    Daulatana
    The Daulatana are a clan of Johiya Rajputs. They are found in Vehari District. They use Mian as a title.

    Dhamial Rajputs
    The Dhamial are a clan of the Janjua Rajputs. They are found mainly in Rawalpindi District, a few families are also found in Jhelum. Like other Potohar tribes, they have both Rajput and Jat section. The Dhamial of Mirpur District of Azad Kashmir are Jats.
    Dhudhi
    The Dhudhi are a clan of Parmara Rajputs. They are found mainly in Sargodha, Jhang, Faisalabad, Multan and Khanewal districts. Like other Rajput clans of southern Punjab, they use Malik as a title.
    Gaharwal
    The Gaharwal are a clan of the Janjua Rajputs. They are found in the Kahuta Tehsil of Rawalpindi District. They use the title Raja.

    Ghorewaha
    Perhaps the largest of the central Punjab clans, found historically in Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar and Ludhiana districts. They are a clan of the Kachwaha Rajputs. After the division of the Punjab, in 1947, they all migrated to Pakistan. However, two Hindu branchs of the tribe are still found in Nawanshahr ( Jadla ) and Hoshiarpur. They are now found mainly in Faisalabad District and use the title Rana.
    Hon
    The Hon or Hoon are a branch of the Parmara Rajputs. Found mainly in the Kahuta Tehsil of Rawalpindi District. Like other Potohar Rajputs, they use the title Raja.
    Jalap
    The Jalap are a clan of Khokhar Rajputs, found in Pind Dadan Khan Tehsil of Jhelum District. They use the title Raja.
    Janjua
    One of the most important of the Potohar Rajput clans. They are found in Jhelum, Chakwal, Khushab and Rawalpindi Districts. They generally use the title Raja, but certain families have the additional title of Sultan.
    Jarral
    In Punjab, the Jaral are found in Wazirabad Tehsil of Gujranwala District. They originate from Rajauri District of Jammu & Kashmir. There was also a small community found in Kangra District, in what is now Himachal Pradesh state.Like Bhao and Chib, whom they resemble, they are a Dogra clan. Some use the title Raja, while others uniquely among Rajputs, use the title Mirza.
    Jasgam
    A Rajput clan found in Gujar Khan , Kotli Sattian and Kallar Syedan tehsils of Rawalpindi District. They use the title Raja.
    Jaswal
    The Jaswal are a Katoch clan, who are overwhelmingly Hindu. The Muslim section lived in Hoshiarpur District. They emigrted to Pakistan, after partion. They use the title Mian.
    Jatal
    A Bhatti Rajput clan, found in the Kahuta Tehsil of Rawalpindi District. Like other Potohar Rajputs, they use the title Raja.
    Jatu
    The Jatu are a Tonwar clan, found mainly in what is now Haryana state. They now form part of the Ranghar community settled in Okara, Kasur and Multan districts. They use the title Rao.
    Jodhra
    The pre-eminent Rajput clan of the Attock District, to which belong the Maliks of Pindigheb. They use the title Malik.
    Johiya
    One of 36 original clans of Rajputs, belonging to the Chandravanshi division. Historically found as far east as Sirsa, in what is now Haryana, to Mianwali in the west of Punjab. The Firozpur, Fazilka and Sirsa Johiya use Rana as a title, while the Johiya of southern Punjab and those of Sargodha and Mianwali, use Malik as a title.
    Kanyal
    The Kanyal are a clan of Minhas Rajputs. They are found mainly in Jhelum District and Gujar Khan Tehsil. Like some other Potohar clans, they have both Rajput and Jat sections. The Rajput section uses Raja as a title.

    Kathia
    The Kathia are a clan of the Parmara Rajputs. They are found mainly in Sahiwal, Khanewal, Vehari and Jhang Districts. They use Mehr as a title.
    Katil
    The Katil are a clan of Suryavanshi Rajputs. They are found mainly in Narowal District. They use Rana as a title.

    Kharal
    The Kharal are a clan of Agnivanshi clan of Rajputs. They are found mainly in Okara, Vehari, Khanewal, Faisalabad and Sahiwal districts. Prior to partition, there were several Kharal villages in Jallandhar and Firozpur districts of Indian Punjab. They use the title Rai.
    Khichi
    The Khichi are a clan of Chauhan Rajputs. They are found mainly in Vehari, Sahiwal, Khanewal,Jhang and Sargodha districts. They use Malik as a title.
    Khokhar
    One of the largest Rajput tribe in Punjab. Historically, the Khokhar were found in Hoshiarpur, Gurdaspur, Amritsar and Jallandhar districts of East Punjab. Most of these emigrated to Pakistan, after the partition of British India. In central Punjab, they were and are still found in Lahore, Gujranwala, Kasur, Sialkot and Gujrat districts. The Khokhars of central and eastern Punjab use Rana as a title. The Khokhars are also found in Sargodha, Multan, Mianwali,Jhang and Sahiwal districts. These Khokhars use Malik as a title. Finally, the Pind Dadan Khan Tehsil, of Jhelum District is home to prominent family, who use the title Raja.
    Langrial
    The Langrial according to some traditions are of Brahmin ancestry, according to others they are a Bhatti clan. Those of Rawalpindi District consider themselves to be Rajputs, while those in other districts
    Lodhra
    The Lodhra are a clan of the Minhas Rajputs. They are found entirely in Lodhran District, the town of Lodhran is named after the tribe.
    Mangral
    The Mangral, are a Rajput clan originating from the Jangladesh region of Rajastan and the historical founders and rulers of the Panjub Hills States of Kotli and Poonch.
    In Punjab they are to be found in Gujrat and Rawalpindi districts, especially in Kahuta Tehsil. They use the title Raja.
    Manj
    The Manj are a Chandravanshi clan. Historically, they were found in Jallandhar, Ludhiana, Amritsar and Hoshiarpur districts. There were and still are a few villages in Lahore District. Like other Muslim Rajputs of East Punjab, they migrated to Pakistan after the partition of India. They are now found in Shikhupura, Faisalabad, Okara and Sahiwal districts. They use the title Raja.
    Marral
    The Marral are a clan of Chauhan Rajputs. Found in Jhang and Bahawalpur. They use the title Malik.
    Meo
    The Meo are a clan of Jadubansi Rajputs, claiming descent from Krishna. They were and many are still found in the Mewat region of India. The districts of Gurgaon, Alwar and Bharatpur formed the Mewat region. After partition, many Meos became refugees. In Punjab, they are found in Narowal, Lahore,Kasur and Okara districts. They use the title Chawdhary.
    Minhas
    The Minhas are a Suryavanshi clan, and are Dogras. The Hindu branch provided the Maharajas of Jammu and Kashmir. Prior to partition, the districts of Hoshiarpur and Gurdaspur were home to a large number of Muslim Minhas. In what became Pakistani territory, they were and are found in numbers in Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum and Rawalpindi districts, which all bordered Jammu and Kashmir. The Mair Minhas, are found in Chakwal District, while the Manes and Lodhra branches were found in south Punjab. The Sialkot and East Punjab Minhas used Mian as a title, and so do the Manes and Lodhra. The Mair Minhas use Chawdhary as a title, while the Gujrat and Potohar Minhas use Raja as a title.
    Nagyal
    The Nagyal are a Minhas clan. They are found mainly in Rawalpindi and Jhelum Districts. Like other Potohar clans, they have both a Rajput & Jat section. The Rajput section uses Raja as a title.
    Narma
    The Narma are a Parmara Rajput clan. They are found in Gujrat, Jhelum and Rawalpindi districts. Like other Potohar Rajputs, they use Raja as a title.
    Naru
    The Naru are a Suryavanshi Rajput clan. Historically found in Hoshiarpur, Jallandhar, Ludhiana and Ambala districts. Like other Muslim Rajputs, they emigrated to Pakistan after partition. Now found in Sargodha, Faisalabad, Sahiwal, Okara and Sheikhupura districts. They use Rana as a title.
    Naul
    The Naul are a clan of the Bhatti Rajputs. They are found in Kasur, Sahiwal, Okara, Sheikhupura, Nankana Sahib and Jhang Districts. They use Mehr as a title.
    Noon
    The Noon are a clan of the Bhatti Rajputs. They are found in Sargodha, Multan and Bhakkar. The Sargodha Noon use Malik as a title, and have historically been connected with the Tiwana tribe. The Multan and Bhakkar Noon use Rana as a tiyle.
    Panhwar
    The Panwhar or Parmara or sometimes Puar are one of the four Agnivanshi clans of the Rajputs. In Punjab, they were found in four clusters, those of central punjab, who were found in Lahore, Amritsar and Firozpur districts. These used the tile Rana. As with other Muslim Rajputs, those of Amritsar and Firozpur emigrated to Pakistan.
    The Panwhar of found among the Seraiki speaking community in Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan. They used Malik as title. In Haryana, the Panwhar or Puar were after the Chauhan, the principal tribe. They used Rao as a title. They have all emigrated to Pakistan, after 1947, and are found in Okara, Kasur and Sahiwal districts.
    And finally, in Jhelum, there were a few villages in the Pabbi hill, who use the title Raja.
    In addition to the Panwhar proper, a number of clans such as the Sial and Tiwana are of Panwhar descent.
    Pathania
    The Pathania are Chandravanshi Rajputs. This clan is overwhelmingly Hindu, with there being only two villages of Muslim Pathania in Gurdaspur District. Like other Muslim Rajput clans, after partition, they emigrated and settled in Pakistan. They use the title Mian.
    Pundir
    The Pundir are a Suryavanshi clan. They were found in the Yamuna valley in Karnal and Ambala districts. Like other Haryana clans, the emigrated to Pakistan. They use the title Rao.
    Ranghar
    The term Ranghar is used to collectively describe the Muslim Rajputs, of what is now Haryana state in India. They mainly belong to the Bargujar, Bhatti, Chauhan, Johiya, Mandahar, Panhwar, Pundir and Tonwar clans. Almost all these clans used Rao as a title. The Ranghar are now found in Okara, Kasur, Bhakkar,Mandi Bahauddin and Multan districts.
    Ratial
    The Ratial is a clan of the Katoch Rajputs. They occupy a few villages in the Kahuta Tehsil of Rawalpindi District. Like other Potohar clans, the use Raja as a title.

    Rathore
    The Rathore are a Suryavanshi Rajput clan. In Punjab, Muslim Rathore were found mainly in Hissar District. In addition to these Rathore, Punjab is also home to Rathore who originate in the Kashmir valley.
    Sarral
    The Sarral are a small clan of unknown origin. They occupy several villages in the Islamabad Capital Territory. Like other Potohar clans, the use Raja as a title.
    Sangra
    The Sangra are clan of the Bhatti Rajputs. They are found mainly in Jhang and Multan districts. They use the title Rai.
    Sohlan
    The Sohlan are a clan of the Parmara Rajputs. Found in a few villages in Jhelum Tehsil. They use the title Raja.
    Tiwana
    The Tiwana are a clan of the Parmara Rajputs. There are two branches of the tribe, those of Khushab, and those of Samana in Patiala District. Those of Samana are now settled in Pakistan as well. The Khushab Tiwana use Malik as a title, while those originally from Samana use Chawdhary.
    Ranial Rajputs
    The Ranial are a branch of the Janjua rajputs. Found in Rawalpindi District of Punjab and the Islamabad Capital Territory. Like other Potohar Rajputs, they use Raja as a title.
    Sial
    The Sial are a clan of Parmara Rajputs. Found in Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Sargodha, Mianwali, Sahiwal, Khanewal, Vehari, Rawalpindi and Jhelum district. The Sial of Jhang use Mehr as a title, while those of Jhelum and Rawalpindi use Raja.
    Sulehria
    The Sulehria, or Salaria or sometime Sulehri are a Suryavanshi clan of Rajputs. Like the Jarral, Bhao, Minhas and Chib, they are Dogra. In Punjab, they are found mainly is Sialkot and Gurdaspur district. The Gurdaspur Sulehria emigrated to Pakistan, after partition. They use the title Mian.
    Tonwar
    The Tonwar or Tomar or Toor are a Chandravanshi Rajput clan. The Tonwar were found in Hissar and Rohtak districts of Haryana. After partition, they settled among other Ranghar communities in Okara and Sahiwal. They use the title Rao. In addition to Tonwar Rajputs, the Punjab is also home to the Toor Jats, who claim Tonwar ancestry, as do the Jarral Rajputs, who are also of Tonwar ancestry.
    Varya Rajputs
    The Varya or Baryah or something Warah are a clan of Suryavanshi Rajputs. Found historically in Ambala, Jalandhar and Patiala State. Like other Muslim Rajputs of the region, they emigrated to Pakistan, after partition.
    Wattu (Wattoo)
    The Wattu or Watto are a clan of the Chandravanshi Rajputs. Historically, they were found in Fazilka, Sira, Zira, Bahawalnagar, Kasur, Okara and Sahiwal. The Fazilka, Sirsa and Zira Wattu emigrated to Pakistan, after the partition of British India. They use the title Mian.
    [edit] List of Muslim Rajput clans from 1911 Census of India
    Here is a list of Muslim Rajput clans that were tabulated in the 1911 Census of India, starting with Rawalpindi District.
    [edit] Rawalpindi District
    According to Census of 1901, the total Rajput population in the district was 101,000 or 18% of the total population.[4]
    • Adrah (792)
    • Baghial (6,715)
    • Bhakral (5,279)
    • Bhatti (19,448)
    • Bains (548)
    • Chatha (420)
    • Chauhan (4,011)
    • Dhamial (14,000)
    • Ghangar (1,022)
    • Gaharwal (2,069)
    • Hon (808)
    • Janjua (4,285)
    • Jatal (1,310)
    • Kahial (3,198)
    • Kanyal (2,317)
    • Ketwal (642)
    • Karlal (961)
    • Minhas (3,270)
    • Mangral (2,309)
    • Mattal (1,347)
    • Mial (817)
    • Mughal (544)
    • Nagyal (2,038)
    • Nagral (2,220)
    • Nagrawal (1,143)
    • Ramal (1,120)
    • Ratial (549)
    • Sarral (698)
    • Thathaal (1,618)
    Other Rajput clans in the district include the Mathyal,, Sehngral, Sohlan, Langrial, Khingar, Chib, Dhudhi, Ghik, Malal, Bhutial, Jamsral, Sainswal, Bijnial, Ramial, Hayal, Janjil, Tharjial, Khumbal, Bharial, Hafyal, Gungal, Salhal,Hattar and Toor.

    [edit] Attock District
    According 1901 Census of India, the total Rajput population of the district was 26,000 or 6% of the total population. Here is a list of the Rajput clans of Attock District.

    • Alpial (8,986)
    • Bhatti (9,956)
    • Chauhan (636)
    • Janjua (1,028)
    • Jodhra (8,085)
    [edit] Jhelum District
    According 1901 Census of India, the total Rajput population of the district was 53,000, or 11% of the total population. Here is a list of the Rajput clans of Jhelum.
    • Bhakral (465)
    • Bhatti (6,586)
    • Chauhan (4,394)
    • Chauhan Taubl (1,229)
    • Gondal (7)
    • Jalap (1,172)
    • Janjua (10,572)
    • Khokhar (770)
    • Mair-Minhas (5,075)
    • Minhas (1,329)
    • Panhwar (518)
    • Ranjha( (866)
    • Sohlan (606)
    [edit] Gujrat District
    According 1901 Census of India, the total Rajput population of the district was 24,000, or 4% of the total population. Here is a list of the Muslim Rajput clans of Gujrat.
    • Bhatti (1,996)
    • Chib (8,360)
    • Janjua (1,559)
    • Khokhar (5,894)
    • Minhas (911)
    • Mukhmdal (852)

    [edit] Shahpur District (Sargodha District)
    • Attar (821)
    • Bhan (519)
    • Bhatti (6,327)
    • Chauhan (977)
    • Dhudhi (1,506)
    • Janjua (3,250)
    • Jhammat (2,143)
    • Johiya (514)
    • Kalyar (2,177)
    • Khichi (833)
    • Khokhar (1,772)
    • Mekan( (1,584)
    • Noon (599)
    • Sial (948)
    • Tiwana (1,540)
    [edit] Mianwali District
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajput clans of Mianwali
    • Bhatti (60)
    • Janjua (986)
    • Johiya (1,650)
    • Khichi (532)
    [edit] Lahore District
    Here is a list of the main Rajput clans of Lahore
    • Bhatti (19,986)
    • Chauhan (1,578)
    • Dhudhi (294)
    • Johiya (843)
    • Khokhar (839)
    • Naru (610)
    • Panhwar (1,702)
    • Rathore (28)
    • Sulehria(989)
    • Bersal (156)
    [edit] Gujranwala District
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajput clans of Gujranwala.
    • Bhatti (9,388)
    • Chauhan (605)
    • Gondal (24)
    • Johiya (11)
    • Khokhar (1,637)
    • Wattu (1,122)
    • Bersal (112)
    [edit] Amritsar District
    Here is the list of the main Muslim Rajput clans in the district.
    • Bhatti (16,752)
    • Chauhan (2,214)
    • Manj (918)
    • Naru (1,043)
    [edit] Sialkot District
    According 1901 Census of India, the total Rajput population of the district was 60,000 or 5.5% of the total population. Here is a list of the Rajput clans of Sialkot District.

    • Bhatti (7,605)
    • Chauhan (873)
    • Janjua (854)
    • Minhas (869)
    • Sulehria (15,627)

    [edit] Motgomery District (Sahiwal District)
    Here is a list of the main Rajput clans of the district.
    • Baghela (923)
    • Bhatti (7,380)
    • Chauhan (627)
    • Doli (639)
    • Dhanwal (559)
    • Dhudhi (778)
    • Dogar (1,300)
    • Jandran (551)
    • Johiya (5,119)
    • Kathia (2,900)
    • Khichi (1,315)
    • Khokhar (1,291)
    • Phullarwan (935)
    • Rath (706)
    • Sial ( 3,286)
    • Wattu (15,647)
    [edit] Gurdaspur District
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajput clans of the district.
    • Bhatti (11,684)
    • Bhao (300)
    • Chauhan (916)
    • Katil (2,047)
    • Manhas (3,655)
    • Manj (1,739)
    • Naru (2,674)
    • Pathania (53)
    • Sulehria (7,941)
    • Bersal (5432)
    • Kohal (2345)
    [edit] Multan District
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajput clans of the district.
    • Bhatti (12,307)
    • Daha (991)
    • Dhudhi (1,138)
    • Johiya (2,383)
    • Khuhi (1,148)
    • Langrial (3,886)
    • Manhas (168)
    • Meun (76)
    • Panhwar (442)
    • Sial (26,393)
    • Taraqar (710)
    [edit] Muzaffargarh District
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajput clans of the district.
    • Bhatti (5,342)
    • Chauhan (564)
    • Johiya (1,502)
    • Panhwar (695)
    • Sial (5,341)
    [edit] Jhang District
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajput clan of the district.
    • Bhatti (5,949)
    • Chadhar (3,284)
    • Chauhan (492)
    • Jhap (1,559)
    • Kala (747)
    • Khokhar (2,091)
    • Sial (41,008)
    [edit] Lyalpur District (Faisalabad District)
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajput clans of the district.
    • Bhatti (5,830)
    • Chauhan (1,455)
    • Kharal (8,043)
    • Khichi (851)
    • Khokhar (856)
    • Manhas (342)
    • Sulehria (809)
    • Naru (647)
    • Sial (4,166)
    • Wattu (2,497)
    [edit] Dera Ghazi Khan District
    Here is a list of the main Rajput clans of the district.
    • Bhatti (7,272)
    • Jamra (508)
    • Johiya (1,500)
    • Panhwar (849)
    • Sial (2,781)
    [edit] Bahawalpur State
    Here is a list of the main Muslim Rajputs in the state.
    • Bhatti (5,052)
    • Chauhan ((5,463)
    • Dhudhi (1,806)
    • Johiya (17,791)
    • Khichi (911)
    • Panhwar (7,757)
    • Rathore (275)
    • Sial (6,281)
    • Tonwar (637)
    • Wattu (2,849)
    • Warha (664)
    [edit] Firozpur District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans in the district were.
    • Bhatti (20,930)
    • Chauhan (3,114)
    • Chadhar (541)
    • Dhudhi (1,208)
    • Johiya (10,837)
    • Kharal (5,638)
    • Khichi (332)
    • Khokhar (4,854)
    • Manj (1,436)
    • Panhwar (4,993)
    • Sial (1,007)
    • Wattu (9,732)
    [edit] Faridkot State
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of the state were:
    • Bhatti (1,651)
    • Johiya (535)

    [edit] Jalandhar District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans were:
    • Bhatti (6,186)
    • Chandel (482)
    • Chauhan (999)
    • Ghorewaha (9,124)
    • Manj (7,154)
    • Naru (5,259)
    • Varya Rajputs (488)

    [edit] Ludhiana District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans in the district were:
    • Barial (633)
    • Bhatti (1,531)
    • Chauhan (1,197)
    • Ghorewaha (3,132)
    • Manj (5,074)
    • Naru (1,453)
    • Panhwar (528)
    • Varya Rajputs (1,324)

    [edit] Malerkotla State
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of the state were:
    • Chauhan (577)
    • Manj (519)
    • Rawat (1,971)
    • Varya Rajputs (378)

    [edit] Kangra District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Kangra District were:
    • Chauhan (138)
    • Jarral (58)

    [edit] Hoshiarpur District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Hoshiarpur District were:
    • Bhatti (3,693)
    • Chauhan (674)
    • Ghorewaha (9,321)
    • Janjua (38)
    • Jaswal (160)
    • Khokhar (1,178)
    • Luddu (340)
    • Manhas (436)
    • Manj (1,465)
    • Naru (15,817)
    [edit] Patiala State
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Patiala State were:
    • Atras (956)
    • Bhatti (3,420)
    • Chandel (136)
    • Chauhan (4,512)
    • Ghorewaha (1,677)
    • Jatu (169)
    • Janjua (465)
    • Johiya (514)
    • Khokhar (495)
    • Mandahar (1,260)
    • Manj (833)
    • Mayen (802)
    • Naru (561)
    • Panhwar (1,353)
    • Rathore (455)
    • Tonwar (3,348)
    • Varya Rajputs (9,941)
    [edit] Jind State
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Jind State were:
    • Chauhan (1,421)
    • Jatu (169)
    • Mandahar (1,444)
    • Panhwar (1,772)
    [edit] Nabha State
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Nabha State were:
    • Bhatti (824)
    • Chauhan (839)
    • Jatu (545)
    • Varya Rajputs (3,621)
    [edit] Ambala District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Ambala District were:
    • Bhatti (1,416)
    • Chauhan (22,333)
    • Dahiya Rajput (3,620)
    • Ghorewaha (2,949)
    • Jadaun (46)
    • Mandahar (525)
    • Pundir (265)
    • Taoni (8,531)
    • Tonwar (1,197)
    [edit] Rohtak District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Rohtak District were:
    • Chauhan (6,545)
    • Jatu (2,011)
    • Panhwar (15,730)
    • Tonwar (29)
    [edit] Karnal District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Karnal District were:
    • Bhatti (485)
    • Chauhan (27,316)
    • Jatu (728)
    • Mandahar (20,857)
    • Panhwar (1,499)
    • Pundir (720)
    • Taoni (742)
    • Tonwar (10,573)
    • Varya Rajputs (611)
    [edit] Gurgaon District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Gurgaon District were:
    • Bargujar (805)
    • Chauhan (4,221)
    • Gaurwa (475)
    • Jatu (482)
    • Khanzada (3,439)
    • Panhwar (850)
    • Tonwar (265)
    [edit] Hissar District
    The main Muslim Rajput clans of Hissar District were:
    • Chauhan (10,929)
    • Jatu (4,644)
    • Johiya (4,785)
    • Jora (834)
    • Kharal (840)
    • Mandahar (617)
    • Mahar (792)
    • Qaimkhani (2,020)
    • Panhwar (850)
    • Raghubansi (1,666)
    • Rathore (534)
    • Satraola (544)
    • Sakhri (743)

    [edit] Hindu Rajputs of Punjab

    Gulab Singh of Jammu and Kashmir (1792-1857) was the founder and first Maharaja of the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir,
    The Hindu Rajput population was historically divided into three groups, those settled along the border with the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, those of the eastern hills (the modern Himachal Pradesh) and finally those along the border with Rajasthan.
    [edit] Hindu Rajputs of the Jammu Border or the Duggar

    Preity Zinta was born into a Hindu Rajput family from Shimla district, Himachal Pradesh.
    Historically, the Jammu border region of Punjab, namely the modern districts of Gurdaspur in India, and Narowal and Sialkot in Pakistan, were home to a large community of Hindu Rajputs. The Rajput tribes of this hilly region were classified on a loose and evershifting system of hypergemous marriage. Thus the Jammu clans were divided by the following social scale:
    • 1st Class (Suryavanshi clans)
    a) Jamwal b) Jasrotia c) Mankotia
    • 1st Class ( Chandravanshi clans)
    a) Bandral b) Bhadwal c) Bilauria d) Hantal e) Bhottial f) Bhadrawah g) Kishtwaria h) Katoch i) Guleria j) Sabia k) Jaswal l) Suketia m) Mandi n) Kullu o) Sarmorie
    • 2nd Class (Suryavanshi clans)
    a) Manhas
    • 2nd Class (Chandravanshi clans)
    a) Ambarai b) Chib c) Jarral d) Bhao
    • 3rd Class (Chandravanshi clans)
    a) Rakwal b) Sulehria c) Charak d) Baghal e) Langeh f) Bajial g) Andotra h) Jaj
    • 4th Class (Chandravanshi clans)
    a) Mandal b) Raisyal c) Kharakhatr d) Samsal e) Jaggi f) Lalotra g) Katil h) Bhulwal i) Hans j) Bajju k) Balwal l) Gori m) Saroch
    Historically, Rajput clans took wifes from clans lower in the social status, but not from the above.
    In Gurdaspur District, the Hindu Rajput clans are as follows:
    • Suryavanshi
    a) Guleria b) Pathania c) Samria d) Khokhar e) Kohal f) Bhatti g) Bhamrotra i) Lamin k) Kakotra j) Naru k) Ladit i) Ghandar j) Makhotra k) Rakwal i) Chauhan j) Madar k) Kanauch i) Samanch j) Janjua k) Dhamdial l) Balim
    • Chandravanshi clans
    a) Jamwal b) Jasrotia c) Manhas d) Harchand e) Jarral f) Sin g) Baghal i) Indauria k) Chib l) Tangral m) Saroch n) Thakkar o) Thakial p) Bhadiar q) Sulehria r) Gahotra s) Malotra t) Manj q) Manjrial u) Rial v) Jhaggi w) Sanauria x) Katil y) Lalotra
    [edit] Rajputs of the Eastern Hills
    The Hindu Rajputs of Hoshiarpur District and Himachal Pradesh are divided into numerous tribes, which are then further divided into numerous septs. The main clan is the Katoch, sub-divided into numerous sub-clans. The three main clans of the Katoch are the Guleria (including the sub-division of Saroch), Jaswal and Dadwal. Other clans included the Chambial (the rulers of Chamba state), Sonkhla, Jamwal, Mankotia, Sampal, Jasrotia and Pathania clans.
    [edit] Major clans of Hindu Rajputs of Punjab
    Here is a brief description of the main clans of Hindu Rajputs.
    • Jaswal
    The orignal setlement of the Jaswal was Kangra. They acquired the name Jaswal from the Jaswan Dun in Hoshiarpur District. They are a branch of the Katoch Rajputs, and as such are Suryavanshi.
    • Sibaia
    The Sibaia were settled at Siba in Dera Tehsil, but the name may be derived from Raja Satpuran Chand, who said to have founded Siba. They are also a Katoch clan.
    • Dadwal
    The Dadwal take their name from the Dadwa Latta tract in Hishiarpur District. They are also a Katoch clan
    • Jarral
    The Hindu Jarral, also known as Rajauria are found mainly in Kangra.
    [edit] Sikh Rajputs

    A depiction of Bhai Bachitter Singh Minhas Ji killing the drunk elephant set by Mughal forces on the Sikh forces in the battlefield with Nagni Barcha (snake spear) given by Guru Gobind Singh Ji. This photo was taken by outside the Sikh History museum on way from Mohali to Sirhind
    Sikh Rajputs are the followers of Sikhism belonging to the Rajput social group. Sikh Rajputs have a long-standing tradition in Punjab and in Sikh history. During the Mughal era when many Punjabi families followed the teachings of the Guru and were baptized as Khalsa and joined the Guru’s order of followers. Many Punjabi Rajput families also enrolled in the Guru’s Army, or Khalsa Panth, and baptized as Khalsa Sikhs.
    Baba Nidhan Singh of Hazoor Sahib, Bhai Sangat Singh Minhas, Bhai Bachittar Singh Minhas and many families whose kin are followers of Sikhism today. There are many Sikh Rajputs today with common Rajput family names.
    [edit] Sikh Rajputs Diaspora

    Yuvraj Singh a famous Indian crickter belongs to Sikh Rajput clan of Bhundel.
    Some Rajput villages in the Punjab Region converted, wholly or partially, to Sikhism. The extent of conversion depended on the influence of Sikhism in that region. The majority of these villages are located in the central Punjab districts of Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Fatehgarh Sahib, Patiala, Faridkot, Moga, Nawanshahr, Kapurthala and Hoshiarpur. Yet, others have migrated from West Punjab districts of Sargodha, Toba Tek Singh, Faisalabad, Montgomery, Lahore etc. after the partition of British India However, there are some Sikh Rajput villages in Ambala and Nalagarh districts of Haryana and Himachal Pradesh, as well.
    [edit] Sikh Rajput Clans
    There are Sikh Rajputs with from clans such as Minhas, Manhas, Bhatti, Bais, Chauhan, Parmar, Parihar, Pawar(Village Ghurial), Rathore, Manj, Doad, Saroya, Sahi, Toor, Janjua, Jaswal, Rana etc. spread across villages in Punjab, Haryana and Himachal Pradesh.
    The medieval forts of Saroya Sikh Rajput Chiefs in the Punjab villages of Chukhiara, Bhungarni, Dihana and Bohan are evident of their heritage. While others, such as the ancestral fort of Minhas Sikh Rajputs of Daroli Kalan, Adampur Doaba and Heeon fort of Parmaras of Nadalon, Panjoura, Ajnoha were destroyed by Ghorewaha Rajput conquerors.During later half of 19′th century the entire area came under the British control.
    [edit] Sikh Rajputs in Khalsa
    Banda reorganised the Khalsa Army and declared a war against the Mughal administration. From the Doaba region, he got help from Sikh Rajputs including:
    • Budh Singh Parmar
    • Dasaundha Singh Parmar
    • Dharam Singh Minhas
    • Gursahai Singh Bhatti
    • Hargopal Singh Chauhan
    • Jiwan Singh Parmar
    • Diwar Singh Khurmi
    • Kanwar Singh Parmar
    • Jodha Singh Khurmi
    • Khan Singh Parmar
    • Krishan Singh Minhas
    • Mehboob Singh Jaswal
    • Punjab Singh Parmar
    • Ram Singh Manj
    • Karam Singh Saroya
    Banda won almost half of the province and he offered Jagirs to his army commanders including the Rajputs, whose heirs are still holding their forts in the villages Chukhiara, Bhungarni, Dihana and Bohan.
    [edit] Prominent Punjabi Rajputs
    Historical figures/Politicians
    • Chaudhry Aurangzeb Khan of Chakwal was a famous Minhas Rajput during the British era. In 1892 C.E he was given the title of Khan Bahadur for his services in establishing the town of Lyallpur (now Faislabad). He was also conferred upon the title of ‘Raja sahib’ as a mark of hereditary distinction by Qaiser-e-Hind, His Majesty, King George V.
    • Raja Muhammed Sarfraz Khan (MLA 1929-58) played an important role in the local politics during Pakistan Movement. He was also instrumental in the educational progress of the region, and gave generous donations to set up schools and the Government College, Chakwal in 1949.
    • Malik Khizar Hayat Tiwana came from a family which had, since the 15th century, been prominent among the landed aristocracy of the Punjab. Malik Khizar Hayat Tiwana was born in 1900 and died in 1975. Tiwana then assisted his father in the management of family estates in the Punjab, taking responsibility for them while his father was in London, 1929-1934. He was elected to the Punjab Legislative Assembly in 1937 and immediately joined the cabinet of Sir Sikander Hyat Khan, who had successfully led the Unionist Muslim League in the election, as Minister of Public Works. Tiwana remained in this post until 1942, succeeding Sir Sikander as Prime Minister to the Punjab from 1942 until 1947.
    • Feroz Khan Noon was Chief Minister of the Punjab province from 1953 to 1956, after which he became Foreign Minister of Pakistan until 1957. On December 16, 1957 he was elected as the seventh Prime Minister of Pakistan. He held this post until October 7, 1958.
    • Mian Mumtaz Daultana was the 2nd Chief Minister of Punjab from April 15, 1951 until April 3, 1953. He belonged to the Daultana clan of the Johiya‎ Rajput caste, settled in Punjab, Pakistan.
    • Manzoor Wattoo was first elected, in 1985, the Speaker of the Provincial Assembly of Punjab, the largest province of Pakistan. Thrice elected for the same office, he secured the office of the Chief Minister of Punjab in 1993 on the PML (Junejo).
    • Raja Zafar ul Haq of Matore, Rawalpindi descended of the Raja Kala Khan Janjua line. He is the Chairman of the Muslim League Party [151] and also is also the Secretary General of the World Muslim Congress since 1992. He has also served as Pakistan’s Ambassador to Egypt from 1985, as well as served as Leader of the House (Pakistan Senate). He was a close associate and minister of information and religious affairs of President Zia ul Haq during his reign. He was also member of cabinet of Prime minister Nawaz Sharif.
    • Dulla Bhatti was a famous legendary Rajput hero of Punjab, who led a rebellion against the famous Mughal king Akbar
    • Allama Mashriqi – Founder of the Khaksar Tehrik
    • Chaudhry Aurangzeb Khan of Chakwal was a famous Minhas Rajput during the British era. in 1892 C.E
    • Rai Bhoe Bhatti – Founder of Nankana Sahib).
    • Rai Bular Bhatti – Son of Rai Bhoe Bhatti and heir to his estate of over 100,000 acres (400 km2) of land in modern day Nankana Sahib District.
    • Chaudhry Chaku Khan chief of the Muslim Mair Minhas Rajput tribe and the founder of Chakwal in 1525 C.E.
    • Raja Muhammed Sarfraz Khan – Famous philanthropist, politician and a member of Pakistan Movement.
    • Muhammed Akbar Khan – The first Muslim to become a General in British Indian Army.
    • Iftikhar Khan – He had been nominated to become the first local Commander in Chief of the Pakistan Army after General Douglas David Gracey’s retirement.
    • Rai Hussain Khan Bhatti – (1859–1951), one of the largest landholders in the Punjab and direct descendant of Rai Bular Bhatti.
    • Malik Umar Hayat Khan- (1875–1944), was a soldier of the Indian Empire, one of the largest landholders in the Punjab, and an elected member of the Council of State of India.
    • Malik Khizar Hayat Tiwana- Prime Minister of the Punjab province, 1942–47.
    • Shah Nawaz Khan- Freedom fighter in India of the Janjua Rajput clan/Lt.Col in the Indian Army and maternal grandfather of Bollywood actor Shah Rukh Khan
    • Feroz Khan Noon- Former Prime Minister of Pakistan
    • Raja Zafar ul Haq- Chairman Pakistan Muslim League(N)
    • Manzoor Wattoo- Former Chief Minister of Punjab
    • Mian Mumtaz Daultana – Former Chief Minister of Punjab
    • Raja Saroop Khan – Former Governor of Punjab
    • Tikka Khan – Former Governor of Punjab
    • Raja Pervaiz Ashraf- Minister for Water and Power of Pakistan.
    • Rana Tanveer Hussain- Former Minister of Defence Production
    • Rana Mohammad Hanif Khan- Finance Minister of Pakistan
    • Rao Sikandar Iqbal- Defence Minister of Pakistan
    • Iqbal Tikka- Former Minister for Food & Agriculture Punjab Assembly
    • Malik Sultan Ali Khan Noon- chief of the Noon family
    • Malik Anwer Ali Noon- Prominent politician and a famous Landlord of Sargodha
    • Malik Amjad Ali Noon- Chairman Prime Minister Inspection Commission of Pakistan
    • Malik Adnan Hayat Noon- former member of the National Assembly of Pakistan
    • Nisar Ali Khan – Current opposition leader in the National Assembly
    • Amir Gulistan Janjua – former governor of the North-West Frontier Province
    • Riaz Khokhar – former Foreign Secretary of Pakistan
    • Raja Anwar – Former minister, journalist and writer
    • Raja Nadir Pervez – Politician and former Army officer
    • M. Nawaz Khokhar – Ex deputy speaker of the National Assembly of Pakistan.
    • Rana Phool Muhammad Khan -MPA from Bhai Pheru (Phool Nagar) 1971,1977,1985,1990
    • Rana Muhammad Hayat Khan – MNA from Bhai Pheru(Phool Nagar) 1990,1996
    • Rana Muhammad Iqbal Khan- Speaker Punjab Assembly -2008
    • Tehmina Janjua – currently Deputy Permanent Representative in United Nations.
    • Tehmina Daultana – Minister for Science and Technology of Pakistan
    • Raja Habib ur Rahman Khan Chibb Rajput of Panjeri Azad Kashmir Chief of Staff Of INA pre partition, Defence Secretary Govt of Pakistan,
    • Rana Khudadad Khan (Late) – President of Pakistan Muslim League (Punjab)
    • Chaudhry Ali Akbar Khan Federal Minister for Home Affairs 1964–1966,
    • Rana Nazeer Ahmed Khan x-fed-minister(1990-93)(97-99)(2002–2004)
    Sports
    • Milkha Singh
    • Jeev Milka Singh
    • Wasim Raja
    • Rameez Raja
    • Aamir Khan (Janjua)British boxer
    • Rana Naved-ul-Hasan
    • Sajid Mahmood (Janjua)
    • Rao Iftikhar Anjum
    • Azmat Rana
    • Shakoor Rana
    • Majid Haq
    • Omer Hussain
    • Sajid Mahmood
    [edit] See also
    • Rajput
    • Muslim Rajput
    • Ranghar
    • Sikh Rajput
    • Punjab
    [edit] References

    Minhas
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    Native Region of Minhas Rajput clan which is now divided between India and Pakistan. The Region includes Azad Kashmir and northern Pakistani Punjab and in India the Jammu region and some parts of Himachal and Indian Punjab.
    Minhas or Manhas or Minhas-Dogra ( Urdu: منہاس) is a Suryavanshi Rajput clan from the Punjab region and Jammu & Kashmir in India and Pakistan. It is an off-shoot of Jamwal-Dogra Rajputs, the founders of the city and state of Jammu and its rulers from ancient times to 1948 C.E. In antiquity of rule, which is generally considered a benchmark of royalty, they are second to none, but the great Katoch Rajputs of Trigarta and Kangra. Paying tribute to the antiquity of their royal lineage, Sir Lepel Griffin says, “These royal dynasties may have been already ancient when Moses was leading the Israelites out of Egypt, and the Greeks were steering their swift ships to Troy.”
    Minhas Rajputs are spread throughout Punjab Region and Jammu & Kashmir in India and Pakistan. Hindu Minhas Rajputs reside in the Indian states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Indian Punjab, Sikh Minhas Rajputs, mainly inhabit Punjab (India) and Muslim Minhas Rajputs reside in Pakistani Punjab and Azad Kashmir.
    Contents
    [hide]
    • 1 Origins
    • 2 Minhas history
    • 3 Etymology
    o 3.1 Minhas and Jamwal Rajputs
    o 3.2 Alternate view point: Greek origin
    • 4 List of Royal Titles used by the Minhas Rajputs
    • 5 Muslim Minhas Rajputs
    o 5.1 Mair-Minhas of Chakwal
    o 5.2 Other Minhas Clans
    o 5.3 Martial traditions and Top military awards
    o 5.4 Politics and civil-public services
    • 6 Sikh Minhas Rajputs
    o 6.1 Minhas villages in Punjab (India)
    o 6.2 Minhas Rajputs in Sikh history
    • 7 Minhas as Jatt Gotra
    • 8 Prominent Minhas Personalities
    • 9 See Also
    • 10 External links

    [edit] Origins

    Wheel of Konark Sun Temple. Konark in Orissa, India is famous for its Sun Temple.The idol worshipped inside the temple represents Konaditya, literally Kon+Aditya (the Sun in a particular direction).
    Minhas Rajputs are Suryavanshis and claim descent from Rama a legendary king of Ayodhya. In Rajputana, their closest cousins are the Kachwaha Rajputs of Jaipur.
    They trace their ancestry to the Ikshvaku dynasty of Northern India (The same clan in which Lord Rama was born. He, therefore is the ‘kuldevta’(family deity) of the Hindu Minhas Rajputs). Specifically, they claim descent from Kusha younger of the twin sons of Rama, hero of the Ramayana, to whom patrilineal descent from Surya is in turn ascribed.
    A Raghuvanshi descendant of Raja Kusha, ‘Agnigarba’ who was living as a recluse, came to Nagarkote (Kangra, Himachal Pradesh), in the Shivalik hills. When the Raja of Kangra came to know about this person’s ancestry, he offered him the hand of his daughter and a part of kingdom. The river Ravi was then the boundary of Nagarkote. Agnigarba crossed it and captured some villages in the Kathua area and declared himself as sovereign king. After his death, his son Bayusharva (1500-1530 B.C.E) married the princess of Parole (Kathua). The princess was known as Erwan and she died young.
    The Raja founded a city after her which is still found near Parole, though now a small village and at the ‘Samadhi’ of the queen, a `Mela’ (fair) is held at every `Baisakhi’ (13th or 14th of April) every year. Bayusharva extended the boundaries up to the river Ujh. Bayusharva’s great grandson, Bahulochan was enthroned after his death. He migrated from Erwan and built his fort on the banks of river Tawi.
    Raja Bahulochan died in a bloody battle with Chadaras, Raja of Sialkot (Shayalkot) and his younger brother Jambulochan (1290-1320 B.C.E) ascended the throne. In those days the area beyond Tawi (the present city of Jammu) was used for hunting. Tradition has it that one day Jambulochan came to this area and while he was sitting behind a bush to ambush some bird or animal, he saw a lion ( a tiger in some accounts ) and a goat drinking water from the same pond. This peaceful coexistence encouraged him to found the city of Jammu, which some say is named after him.
    One of his descendants, Raja Shaktikaran (1177-1200 B.C.E) introduced the Dogri Script for the first time. Another of his descendants, Jasdev founded the city of Jasrota on the bank of river Ujh, and another Raja, Karan Dev built a fort on the banks of the river Basantar. In the early centuries of the first millennium the area came under the sway of the Indo-Greeks, with their capital at Sakala (Sialkot).
    His later descendants, the Dogras ruled over the state for hundreds of years till 1948 C.E, when the state of Jammu and Kashmir officially acceded to India. Maharaja Hari Singh Dogra was the last in the long list of the Dogra rulers of Jammu. The Dogras also ruled over the Kashmir Valley for three brief terms, twice for short periods around 1000 C.E and one last time when Maharaja Gulab Singh Dogra became the Maharaja of Kashmir after the fall of the Sikh Kingdom of Punjab following the Second Anglo-Sikh War in 1849 C.E.
    [edit] Minhas history
    The Minhas and Bhatti Rajput clans were extremely powerful during the time of the Hindu Shahi dynasty of Kabul and ruled over many small kingdoms extending from eastern Afghanistan through the Jammu/Sialkot areas of West Punjab and up to the Jalandhar/Kangra area of eastern Punjab. According to Farishta, during the second battle of Tarain between Prithviraj Chauhan and Mohammad Ghori in 1192, Chauhan’s left flank consisted of Hindu Pathan cavalry. It is said that this Hindu Pathan cavalry was led by a minhas raja from the northwest.
    A famous Manhas/Minhas in history was Baba Chamliyal also called Duleep Singh Minhas, a warrior saint, whose Samādhi (place of cremation) is still visited by hundreds and thousands of Pakistanis and Indians each year in the month of June. The Mela (fair) which is held in honour of Baba Chamliyal, was celebrated for the 317th time on Thursday, June 22, 2006 as the man-made boundary between India and Pakistan lost its importance momentarily and people from both sides participated in the mela with vigour.
    Banda Bahadur, the famous disciple of Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru and the founder of the Khalsa Brotherhood was born into a Minhas Rajput family in Rajouri in the Jammu region. Banda Bahadur was an accomplished warrior-general, who almost destroyed Mughal presence in eastern Punjab and arguably created the first Sikh State.
    [edit] Etymology
    [edit] Minhas and Jamwal Rajputs
    All the descendants of Raja Jambu Lochan were called Jamwal Rajputs, until Raja Malan Hans Dev took up agriculture as a profession and left the throne to his younger brother, Raja Suraj Hans Dev. Rajputs in general and those in the Punjab hills in particular have had a strong prejudice against taking up agriculture as a profession and therefore Raja Malan Hans and his descendants were styled Minhas.
    Since that time anyone in the Jamwal clan who took up agriculture or converted to Islam was called Minhas whereas the name Jamwal has been confined to the royal branch including the Maharajas of Jammu and Kashmir.
    [edit] Alternate view point: Greek origin
    It is likely that because the ancient Indo-Greek/Bactrian Kingdoms overlapped with Minhas territory Bactria, Gandhara the name originates from Minas or Minos the Greek god, son of Zeus and Europa who was king of Crete and many of the Aegean islands. Many of the Minas line may have travelled into Bactria & Gandhara with Alexander the Great and remained behind and inter-married with the local populations.
    Additionally there are also large numbers of Minas in Armenia, Turkey, Persia, Russia and other Central Asian states. Often the Armenians and Turks use the name as Minasian (“of the Minas family”) or Minasyan.
    Manhas could also possibly mean son of Man as “Manu”, “Manushya”, “Manav” and “Manas” are Sanskrit terms for “Man” while Manasi means “Woman” .
    [edit] List of Royal Titles used by the Minhas Rajputs
    Maharaja: This title was adopted by Raja Gulab Singh of Jammu after he annexed Kashmir and Ladakh and became the ruler of the state of Jammu & Kashmir. He was also accepted as the chief by all the Jamwal and Minhas Rajputs.
    Raja: Most members of the Minhas tribe including Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs use the title ‘Raja’ as this title was used by most of the Rajput rulers from ancient times.
    Rana: Rana is a princely title of Royalty. Muslim Minhas Rajputs in Pakistan mainly in Lahore, Sheikhupura, Gujranwala and Sialkot use the title of Rana.
    Khan: Mulsim Mair Minhas Rajput use the title of Khan. Raja Bhagir Dev was named Muhammed Mair after conversion to Islam and his descendants as Mair-Minhas Rajputs. Most of Muslim Mair Minhas use the title of Khan.
    Mian: This title was conferred upon the ‘Punjab Hill Chiefs’ by the Mughal King, Jhangir and was used by most of the Rajput tribes in the Punjab Hills for many centuries. The elder brother was called Raja, whereas his younger brothers were called Mian. Lately, the Rajputs have decided to use ‘Thakur’ instead of this Mughal title.
    Thakur: Hindu Minhas Rajputs in eastern Punjab hills used this Rajput title also. A joint assembly of all the hill Rajputs also approved a resolution in 1936 and decided to use the title Thakur instead of Mian.
    Kumar: This title is used by the younger Hindu Minhas Rajputs to signify that their father Thakur the senior head of the household is still alive.
    Chaudhry: This title was conferred upon the Muslim Minhas Rajputs of Dhanni(present day Chakwal) by the Mughal King, Zaheerudin Babur. However, during Maharaja Ranjeet Singh’s era, the title lost its exclusivity as the Maharaja gave this title to all the village-heads around Punjab. Ever since, the Chaudhrys of Chakwal style themselves as Chaudhrials to distinguish themselves from the newly appointed men.
    Sirdar: This title is manily used by the Sikh Minhas Rajputs. However, lately some Muslim Minhas Rajput clans in Azad Jammu & Kashmir and Punjab Sialkot & Chakwal have also started using this title due to various reasons.
    Rai: There is also a considerable population of Minhas families in Sialkot in the districts of Rangpura and Heerawalapura. They are descendants of Rai Luckoo Minhas.
    Singh: The title Singh used by the Hindu and Sikh Minhas Rajputs while Mulsim Minhas Rajputs use Khan.
    [edit] Muslim Minhas Rajputs

    Percentage Composition of selected Punjab District Populations of Hindus and Sikhs : 1941 that became part of Pakistan [1]
    -District Hindu Sikh
    Attock
    6.4 3.0
    Dera Ghazi Khan
    0.9 0.2
    Gujranwala
    11.8 10.9
    Gujrat
    7.7 6.4
    Jhang
    15.9 1.5
    Jhelum
    6.5 3.9
    Lahore
    16.3 18.4
    Lyallpur (Faisalabad today)
    7.2 19.8
    Mianwali
    20.3 1.2
    Montgomery (Sahiwal today)
    14.4 13.2
    Multan
    20.5 5.2
    Muzaffargarh
    12.7 0.8
    Rawalpindi
    10.5 8.2
    Shahpur/Sargodha
    10.1 4.8
    Sheikhupura
    9.1 18.9
    Sialkot
    19.4 11.7

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