Meltdown in Tunisia and Its Relevance to Pakistan

By Adnan Bashir

A twenty six years old young computer science graduate roams about in hunt of employment. There are no job openings and the inflation is sky rocketing. The young man is forced to sell fruits and vegetables in the streets to make his both ends meet. He doesn’t have the licence and one fine day the police intervenes and confiscates his cart. The young man is incensed and sets himself on fire. Sounds familiar?

This is not Pakistan. But this may well be Pakistan……!

There are obvious parallels to be drawn from the circumstances leading to revolt in Tunisia. Corruption, nepotism and unemployment were rampant. The society was said to be virtually divided in two classes. First, the elites and a closely knitted network and clan of top brass comprising relatives of the president or first lady (second lady in case of his second wife) having complete control over and exploiting the national resources and second the rest of the exploited nation.  Credibility of the government had virtually ceased. Food inflation had soared to the point of intolerance.

The violent sensation and overwhelming reaction sparked by the incident triggered everything ablaze. Masses took to the streets and brought the government to the knees within a matter of days. Head of the state who was elected by a landslide majority of almost 90% votes only a couple of years ago had to flee and seek refuge in Saudi Arabia to escape the wrath of the nation.

The vibes and tremors have been felt in the region. A ripple effect has been created that transcends nationalities and geographical boundaries inducing a chain reaction. People have set themselves ablaze attempting self immolation in Egypt, Algeria and Mauritania sending clear signals to the respective regimes. There has even been reported demonstration in prosperous and growth oriented Oman.

The emerging pattern potentially signifies a brewing unrest and upheaval against the totalitarian and autocratic, in some cases dynastic, regimes that have been imposed and linger on as a tradition. Whether the waves of change that have been triggered and initiated shake the foundations of these rules is anybody’s guess!?

University of Michigan History Professor Juan Cole in his interview with Amy Goodman on ‘Democracy Now’ describes the development as the first popular revolution since 1979’s Islamic revolution in Iran. Nevertheless, it varies widely in nature and dimensions. Juan Cole terms it a populist revolution spearheaded by labour movements, internet activists and rural workers. It has a tendency to evolve as a democratic movement much to the resentment and galvanization of Arab regimes having minimal entrenchment and roots in the populace where societies are marred by limited employment opportunities and economic stagnation. Ironically, a concern that is even shared by their worst adversary, Israel as any prospective development leading to more democratic formations in the region does not augur well for Israel.

Shibley Telhami, Professor for Peace and Development, University of Maryland interprets the revolution in a different light. According to him what is unique about this uprising is not just that it is the first one in the Arab world but also that it happens without any leadership. Apparently, it is inspired by a new empowerment and mobilization medium i.e the Internet, twitter and information revolution. As per Shibley, what we witness is possibly a delayed impact of the information revolution.

Uncharacteristic of Arab behaviour though, what has been surprising is the flurry of events and toppling of government in such a short span of time. While the rest of the Arab world may well resonate as the spillover effect is created lending greater impetus to the movement, the implications are far reaching. Poverty, hunger, disease and deprivation are prevalent in third world countries. People are resorting to extremes like suicides, killings and extortion in countries like Pakistan. Spiraling inflation, poor standard and quality of living, rising unemployment, towering debt, corruption and nepotism are the distinctive features and elements of our economy. With all those fundamentals and indicators yielding to limits how far off are we from impending flash point amidst those winds of change?

References :-

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/international/jan-june11/tunisia2_01-17.html

http://www.juancole.com/2011/01/juan-cole-tunisia-uprising-spearheaded-by-labor-movements-by-internet-activists-by-rural-workers-it%e2%80%99s-a-populist-revolution-democracy-now.html




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