Articles Comments

Pak Tea House » Army, Islam, quetta, Religion, Terrorism » The Dwindling Hope and the Case for Military Action

The Dwindling Hope and the Case for Military Action

Raza Habib Raja
Terrorism has again struck Shiites in Quetta killing many people. As I write these sentences, the targeted Hazaras who have witnessed massacre over the past many years, are refusing to bury the bodies and demanding direct military rule in Quetta. This is the lowest Pakistan can get where the state has become so dysfunctional that people actually start wanting direct military rule.

In the rest of the Pakistan, there have been sporadic protests but I really don’t know whether these will materialize into something or not. I have seen so many points which should have been the “turning” points but these have all passed away an Pakistan in adversity retains its status quo.

Suicide attacks have become so rampant that they have stopped evoking horror the way they used to a few years ago. I don’t know whether it is sheer hopelessness or has become a way of life where people simply accept a perverse phenomenon and try to “adjust” their lives. It’s a stage where people have by and large given up and have accepted a thing as given and as something beyond their control.

For the past few years, I have witnessed a steady erosion of hope and have seen despair and disappointment seeping in. The magnitude of this despair has become so much that an extremist act like suicide bombing, despite killing dozens of people, is not even making headlines ( unless they have a huge magnitude) or evoking horror or revulsion. In fact people have simply assimilated terrorism as a part of reality-something which cannot be overcome and is here to stay. Now daily rituals are being planned with an understanding that there is a realistic probability, though still small, that you may end up being a victim yourself. Of course the future plans also inculcate this possibility along with the fact that inflation, power shortages and deteriorating standard of living has made living in Pakistan a difficult long term prospect.

Nowadays literally everyone is talking about migration to other countries. And biggest irony is that now the entire world is shrinking for the green passport holders. Immigration across the globe is becoming tougher. Pakistanis are beginning to realize that their desperation to leave the country could not have been more ill timed as the world clearly has started to mistrust them. Even the frequent travelers are finding it increasingly difficult to get US or UK visa in particularly.

With this dwindling of fortunes, has come the stark realization that for majority of us, Pakistan will be the place to live and die. And yet we are not ready to wake up and challenge our own sense of delusion, denial and if not these two, then our apathy. It is our land, and we are helplessly and in fact impotently letting it slip away into the dark abyss of extremism. During the course of this strange collective moral suicide, which is much more horrifying than even the wrath brought by the suicide bombers, we are still pointing fingers at the wrong side. Conspiracy industry is still thriving though shock after every suicide bombing has drastically diminished.

For the past one and half years, I have been studying in the United States. Needless to say these times are the best times of my life further enhanced by the fact that Pakistan right now is facing its worst times in every possible indicator. To be away from Pakistan, ironically is a “blessing” and yet I never wanted it to be like that. My time in USA is coming to an end and I hate myself for this thought: I am dreading to go back.

Yet I love this country despite the allegation which are at times hurled by some that I am not patriotic. I am patriotic but my concept of patriotism is not to “defend” Pakistan when it is under the critical microscope of the outside world but to try my two cents to address what I think is the real reason behind this image.

Pakistan’s worst enemy is not outside Pakistan. It is within us and as the time goes by we are still not coming to terms with it. The moment we collectively realize it, will be the moment when the long and bloody road towards recovery will begin. It is our war and we have to fight it. Yes blood will be split but it is already splitting. At least we will go down fighting

Pakistan! Stop believing that military action against militants will be against your own people. It will be to liberate your people out of the clutches of the monsters which are using religion to promote their philosophy of hate and intolerance.

Unlike some of the liberals, I won’t say that everything in Pakistan is ISI sponsored. The reason is simple: Pakistan army installation have also been attacked. In my opinion it is the Frankenstein monster which was once nurtured by them but now it is out of control. It is just like feeding a crocodile and expecting that it won’t harm you. But crocodile by instinct has to eat and will eat its feeders also.

Pakistan! Let’s push for a military action now. Pakistani military is the one responsible for bringing the country to this stage and now it has to be given the responsibility of cleaning up the mess.

Today they are massacring Shiites. Tomorrow it will be the “kafir” Sunni sects. If today we don’t feel their pain then tomorrow, we will ourselves be under the receiving end.

Pakistan!. Let us brace ourselves. This is our war and we have to fight it because complacency is certain extermination.

Written by

Filed under: Army, Islam, quetta, Religion, Terrorism · Tags: , , ,

51 Responses to "The Dwindling Hope and the Case for Military Action"

  1. Rex Minor Germany Google Chrome Windows says:

    PS

    Ouster of two PM’s. No one from the ruling Peoples party should be allowed to take over the office of the PM! Perhaps in Pakistan they should practice a vaiation to the western democracy norm and appoint the leader of the opposition, i.e., the minority party leader be mae the PM of the country.

Leave a Reply

*


− seven = 1

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>