Islamists attempting to concoct another fake Jinnah quote

Fake

Some twitter handles are circulating the picture above. I reproduce here the complete discussion by Jinnah on 14 July 1947. As you can see the quote is fake.

Q. Could you as governor-general make a brief statement on the minorities problem?

A. At present I am only governor-general designate. We will assume for a moment that on August 15 I shall be really the governor-general of Pakistan. On that assumption, let me tell you that I shall not depart from what I said repeatedly with regard to the minorities. Every time I spoke about the minorities I meant what I said and what I said I meant. Minorities to whichever community they may belong will be safeguarded. Their religion or faith or belief will be secure. There will be no interference of any kind with their freedom of worship. They will have their protection with regard to their religion, faith, their life, their culture. They will be, in all respects, the citizens of Pakistan without any distinction of caste or creed. The will have their rights and privileges and no doubt along with this goes the obligations of citizenship. Therefore, the minorities have their responsibilities also, and they will play their part in the affairs of this state. As long as the minorities are loyal to the state and owe true allegiance, and as long as I have any power, they need have no apprehension of any kind.

Q. Would your interest in the Muslims of Hindustan continue as it is today?

A. My interest will continue in Hindustan in every citizen and particularly the Muslims.

Q. As president of the All India Muslim League what measures do you propose to adopt to assure the safety of Muslims in Hindu provinces?

A. All that I hope for is that the Muslims in the Hindustan states will be treated as justly as I have indicated we propose to treat non-Muslim minorities. I have stated the broad principles of policy, but the actual question of safeguards and protection for minorities in the respective states can only be dealt with by the Constituent Assembly.

Q. What are your comments on recent statements and speeches of certain Congress leaders to the effect that if Hindus in Pakistan are treated badly they will treat Muslims in Hindustan worse?

A. I hope they will get over this madness and follow the line I am suggesting. It is no use picking up the statements of this man here or that man there. You must remember that in every country there are crooks, cranks, and what I call mad people

Q. Would you like minorities to stay in Pakistan or would you like an exchange of population?

A. As far as I can speak for Pakistan, I say that there is no reason for any apprehension on the part of the minorities in Pakistan. It is for them to decide what they should do. All I can say is that there is no reason for any apprehension so far as I can speak about Pakistan. It is for them to decide. I cannot order them.

 
Q. Will Pakistan be a secular or theocratic state?

A. You are asking me a question that is absurd. I do not know what a theocratic state means.

Q. Correspondent suggested that a theocratic state meant a state where only people of a particular religion, for example Muslims, could be full citizens and non-Muslims would not be full citizens.

A. Then it seems to me that what I have already said is like throwing water on a ducks’s back. When you talk of democracy I am afraid you have not studied Islam. We learned democracy thirteen centuries ago.

  • Arzu

    Romain Bhai,
    Are you for real ? … yah Aap mereY majey leY rahey hO..
    .
    I only stated the reality…
    I know Gorky saab means well not for just us Indians but for Pakis as well..

  • The Observer

    amarprabhu ‘Were you this confused as a child as well, or is it a recent phenomenon doctors are still looking for a cure for?’

    OYE AMAR CHITRA KATHA KUTH,EY DUKAAN BAND KAR , BEKAAR KI BAAT bakna band kar kuth.ey, have a drink or two on a sunday morning n chill, you will be able to recover some senses n crap well on pth

  • Arzu

    Gorky Saab,
    I understand and highly appreciate the role NRI,s and diaspora is playing and shall continue to play in future for us in India… Please forgive me if you ever felt it this way.. we know the part played by diaspora in supporting Modi ( and I thank Mohanbhai and Dubai NRI) for building the momentum…
    Sirji, I understand the sectarianism and insurgency people have gone thru in Punjab , I appreciate that they stood for a composite culture culture since Guru Nanak ( Sat Shri Akal) called India ..
    We will always need you Sir.. difference of POV notwithstanding..

  • The Observer

    Gorki Sir thank you

  • Amar Prabhu

    Observer
    .
    It was the first day of 3rd grade, and a new school for Observer. As a test, the teacher went around the room and asked each of the students to count to 50. Some did very well, counting as high as 30 and 40, with just a few mistakes. Others couldn’t get past 20. Observer, however, did extremely well. He counted past 50, right up to 83. He was so excited that he ran home and told his (illiterate) dad how well he had done. His dad nodded and told him, “That’s because you are from Karnataka, son.” (Note from AP: Karnataka people are smart). The next day, in English language class, the teacher asked the students to recite the alphabet. Most made it about half way through without much trouble. Some made it to M and N, but Observer rattled off the alphabet right to W. That evening, Observer once again bragged to his (illiterate) grandpa about his prowess in his new school. His Nana, knowingly, explained to him, “Son, that’s because you are from Karnataka.” The next day, after Physical Education, the boys were taking showers. Observer noted that, compared to the other boys in his grade, he seemed overly well endowed. This confused him. That night he told his (illiterate) dad, “Dad, they all have little tiny ones, but mine is ten times bigger than theirs. Is that because I’m from Karnataka?” “No, son,” explained his Dad, “That’s because you’re 18.”
    .
    Observer, is it true that you were already in 3rd grade when you were all of 18?

  • Mohan

    Thinking is difficult, that’s why most people judge others.

  • HP

    test

  • HP

    Amar Prabhu and Observer both have a point. So far as communism goes (which is what Observer seems to have implicated Bose with) Nehru certainly had no parallel among all the leading figures in Indian independence. He himself frequently said that he agreed a lot with the communists and found many similarities of his own thinking with orthodox communism. Interestingly his dislike for fascism was also rooted in the fact that he considered it as nothing more than a crude form of capitalism. In addition to economic policies, in the garb of non-alignment, Nehru’s foreign policy was also staunchly pro-Soviet. His speech on Stalin in 1953 seems to have been right from the heart, and not just some diplomatic niceties spoken at the death of a leader of a friendly nation.
    .
    Bose, on his part, rejected communism as a viable path for India because it rejected religion. He, unlike Nehru, saw India as a collection of people with religion as an integral part of their lives, and thus unsuitable for communism. What is less well known is that he rejected fascism as well, and advocated a middle path which he called samyavad , a term derived from the philosophy of ancient India.
    .
    Observer also has a point when he says that these people were creating and witnessing history in real time, and judgement of history was not yet in. Let’s also not forget that during those turbulent times, communsim and fascism represented the only two viable forces opposing British imperialism, which itself was repressive. Ultimately, communism ended up killing many more than fascism (with Mao (80 million) killing more than Stalin (40 million) and Hitler (20 million) put together), but over its over hundred years rule in India British imperiliasm was also responsible for a similar number of deaths by at least one large famine every 10 years, that magically seemed to disappear with minor exceptions in independent India.
    .
    It is thus unfair and childish to play the game of “guilt by association” that both Subhas and (by now the far smaller) Nehru camps are good at playing. Nehru’s economic policies were disastrous, but his saving grace and achievement were liberalism and secularism that kept India workable. At the same time, it is absolute lunacy to say that, had Subhas been able to return, then given his stellar track record as two times Congress President and committment to liberalism and secularim, and, more importantly his lifelong respect for Gandhi whom he called the father of the nation, he would have turned himself in a Kim Jong Il of North Korea.
    .
    That brings us to the question, why has there been so much secrecy about the entire episode of Subhas’s death to warrant the maintenance of 100’s of classified files in his name for nearly 70 years despite unilateral affirmation by the Government of India as to its date, place and mode as submitted by the Japanese authorities? Why classify cartloads of documents in the dead man’s name who was instrumental in bringing India her independence, and that too, do so in free soverign and independent India when Britain could not punish even a single INA men on charges levelled against them even when India was still under her subjugation. Who exactly does the Government fear, foreign nations or the people of India? If so, why? Was Subhas executed by Stalin in full knowledge of the Indian Government for which even today there is so much secrecy over the Netaji Files? These are so many pertinent questions whose answers lie in the womb of these Secret Files now seeking deliverance in the fullness of gestation.

  • romain

    Arzu,
    If you have followed my posts, my position has not changed.

  • Mohan

    Writ petition for declassification of files relating to Subhas Chandra Bose has been listed in Supreme Court for today.

  • kaalchakra

    Riaz, excellent work as always. Modi’s election has definitely signaled a change.

  • Fingolfin

    “Nehru certainly had no parallel among all the leading figures in Indian independence. He himself frequently said that he agreed a lot with the communists and found many similarities of his own thinking with orthodox communism.”
    .
    One of India’s greatest scholars and Mathematician/Marxist Historian D D Kosambi was a severe critic of Nehru’s policies and said that Nehru was promoting capitalism under the garb of democratic socialism. Kosambi was of course a huge fan of the Chinese revolution under Mao.
    .
    The way you look at it depends on where you come from.

  • kaalchakra

    huh…wrong board.

  • HP

    Fingolfin, Don’t know why Kosambi said that, but if he was expecting Nehru to follow the example of Chairman Mao (whom our Naxals idolized) and launch the “Great Leap Forward” forcefully collectivizing agriculture and killing 40 million people in a little over 2 years (1959 to 1961), and creating a “socialist” India wherein anyone who got in the way was done away with — by execution, imprisonment or forced famine — then I feel his pain it didn’t happen. Don’t know if it indeed had happened what would have happened to Kosambi though, because the number one enemy of Chairman Mao was the intellectual. He is known to have referred his murder of 46,000 scholars in 10 years as a major accomplishment as part of his “Great Cultural Revolution”, which from 1966-1976 transformed China into a great House of Fear. We should sympathize with Kosambi Nehru didn’t go that far.

  • kaalchakra

    “Don’t know why Kosambi said that”

    HP and FF, that’s not so out of character. Mr Jinnah was called a Kafir too.

  • Fingolfin

    Well Nehru was always pro-industry but he wanted to strictly regulate through the government. So he was all about big government and it was not free market in that India was anything but business friendly. It is therefore not absurd to call it capitalistic in a sense given that Nehru was not running elaborate spending schemes for poor people like UPA was. Of course India did not have the capital money to do that but Kosambi’s gripe with Nehru was that there was no emphasis in that direction. Nehru failed miserably on primary education for example.
    .
    It is hard to come to terms with the fact that someone with the unparalleled brilliance of Kosambi and someone whose conscience dictated his politics, could be supportive of the great leap forward. I think he just did not have “those” facts about it( 40 million dead for example) and the Chinese have been great at hiding them. Would not have been hard in those days especially. However China certainly has progressed immensely. Although that had more to do with Deng Xiaoping than Mao.

  • Majumdar

    FF mian,
    .
    It is only folks with unparalleled brilliance and conscience who bump off folks in those numbers (c 40 M). Comrade Kosambi wud have done well as India’s Brother No.1
    .
    Regards

  • Fingolfin

    Well Mao was neither of those things…

  • HP

    Fingolfin, Nehru killed private enterprise, plain and simple. To him profit was a dirty word, as he said to JRD Tata quite clearly. Minoo Masani, who started of as a Congress socialist but post ’47 got disillusioned with Stalinist excesses in Soviet Union, proposed a mixed economy consisting of a small sector of nationalized industries, a larger sector of new public enterprises in areas where free enterprise was unable to venture into, and a third, largest sector of free enterprises. Nehru killed it in his lifelong zeal to foist the Soviet pattern of state intervention. You are right though, the allocations for basic health and primary education in the first few five year plans were abysmally low.
    .
    “It is hard to come to terms with the fact that someone with the unparalleled brilliance of Kosambi and someone whose conscience dictated his politics, could be supportive of the great leap forward.”
    .
    Charu Majumdar and Kanu Sanyal were both brilliant students and extremely conscientious in personal lives. They were sons of Zamindars but lived lives of penury and eventually died miserable deaths for others. That didn’t stop them from admiring Chairman Mao and founding Communist Party of India (Marxist–Leninist) that continues till today. Kobad Gandhy and his wife Anuradha Shanbag are other examples.

  • Fingolfin

    HP
    .
    Nehru’s distrust of capitalism stemmed from what happened to India economically during the colonial period. He just did not see for profit as a way out. A government elected by people should be the only body taking any decision affecting people was his drift. Wrong in retrospect, but I can empathize. Plus he was also being advised by P.C Mahalanobis et al and they told him nothing different.
    .
    If the gory details of what Mao was doing did not reach them, I am not surprised that they supported Mao. Kosambi though was severely critical of the left in India too. Wrote quite a bit critiquing the leftist narrative.
    .
    Shockingly and almost unbelievably, the communists in India then did not support the Zamindari Abolition Act that Nehru introduced. No bipartisanship at all. They hated the government and everything Nehru did had to be attacked. They ensured such stupidity prevented them from becoming an all India presence.
    Nehru in turn disliked communists quite a bit himself because he said they did not recognize or respect constitutionality. Did you know that the Marxist Historian was denied a passport for being a communist activist in Nehru’s day? This was when he wanted to go to Oxford for his PHD. Nehru called him home and scolded him for being a communist and that he had been to Russia and China and criticized both countries for the way things were being done. He said he could not do anything about the passport because that was in the hands of G.B Pant, but Habib received his passport two days later 😀

  • Fingolfin

    *hat the Marxist Historian Irfan Habib

  • HP

    Fingolfin
    .
    Actually Nehru’s love for communism predates Mahalonobis (it developed in the 20’s and the 30’s). Under Nehru India was one of the first countries to recognize Communist China and Nehru even defended its aggression in Korea. But an armed invasion was enough to sour even a socialist romantic like him on China. But Nehru remained enamored with the Soviet Union (his state visit there lasted for 15 days!), and in particular with its narrow model of central economic management.
    .
    But Nehru’s version of socialism was somewhat looser than those being executed in Moscow or Baijing. Rather than direct state management of all aspects of economic life Nehru preferred a mixed system, introducing a system of licenses, regulation, and cartelization. Mahalonobis happened to be a gifted mathematician and statistician not economist and had little power to influence Nehru. In any case, Nehru’s indoctrination happened much earlier, in the 20’s and 30’s.
    .
    Planned Indian economy under Nehru turned out to be every bit as disastrous as the Russian and Chinese economies, even though it was not accompanied by the near genocidal violence that was unleashed in the latter two. Under Nehru license permit raj led to massive corruption and the numbers do not capture the consequent stagnation of Indian society and the enormous squandering of human lives that this needless impoverishment produced.
    .
    “If the gory details of what Mao was doing did not reach them, I am not surprised that they supported Mao.”
    .
    They did not just support Mao, they took up guns and started what we know as the naxalite movement (CPI(ML)) today.
    .
    “Kosambi though was severely critical of the left in India too. Wrote quite a bit critiquing the leftist narrative.”
    .
    So was CPI (ML) who believed that the mainstream left had shunned the path of revolution by taking part in the democratic process.

  • HP

    KC
    .
    “Mr Jinnah was called a Kafir too.”
    .
    Actually I am not surprised that he was. While reading Bose’s papers I noticed that he consistently referred Jinnah as the leader of the progressive and anti-British faction of the Muslim League. This is one reason Bose didn’t seem to dislike him very much (on par with the other Congress leaders) because he was not the leader of the pro-British faction.

  • keval

    Whole of this arab religion is a concoction to fool and misuse humans and put them under arab racism.
    Such concoctions can only be maintained by using fascist methods. So in the muslim societies fascism is the way of life. From childhood to the top rungs of the society lies and fascism and violence are the keywords of control and description of “reality”.

  • Rex Minor

    FF,
    It may come as a surprise to you but Mao was a muslim but decided to join in the communist political movement.

    Rex Minor

  • Mohan

    Azad Hind fauj ke kazane ki loot mein shamil the Nehru. http://t.co/mcroVnJmCj

  • Naqvi

    Saba Naqvi’s Intentional Ignorance on Raza Academy
    .
    In the second week of September, a fatwa(Islamic decree) was issued at the behest of Mumbai-based Islamist organisation Raza Academy against Oscar-winner Indian music director A. R. Rahman and Iranian filmmaker Majid Majidi for their film, “Muhammad: Messenger of God.”
    .
    The fatwa declared Rahman and Majidi as “infidel”, adding: “It is nothing short of a crime to make a film on the Prophet [Muhammad].“Although fatwas are advisory opinions, they have come to mean “death” and carry more weight than law in the everyday lives of common Muslims.

    .

    Saeed Noori of Raza Academy demanded an apology from Rahman and others.

    .

    On September 14, senior journalist Saba Naqvi tweeted that Raza Academy was a non-entity:

    .

    “Who had heard of Raza foundation [sic] before they came up with an opinion on A. R. Rahman? This is how fringe nonentities get traction.”

    .

    Her tweet was targeted not at Raza Academy but at those who were criticising it. On the same day, 14 September, the leading commentator Swapan Dasgupta reminded Saba Naqvi through a tweet that Raza Academy is a well-known organisation and as an expert of Hindu-Muslim politics, she would know of it. His tweet reads:

    .

    “It is sad that as an ‘expert’ on communal politics you haven’t heard of Raza Foundation…”

    .

    Raza Foundation is the same as Raza Academy, the last being the official name. Some words in the tweets of Saba Naqvi and Swapan Dasgupta are standardised here for clarity.

    .

    In India, a generation of journalists have been trained in the Amartya Sen Model of Intellectual Semi-literacy, which loves to amplify an isolated statement of a fringe extremist Hindu into a national conversation while hard-core Islamists like Raza Academy that threaten the nation’s rule of law are declared non-entities.

    .

    Saba Naqvi disregarded Swapan Dasgupta’s tweet and proceeded, two days later, on 16 September, to author another tweet in which she persisted with her line of “reasoning”that Raza Academy was a non-entity. Her tweet of 16th September reads:

    .

    “The importance of non-entities like Raza foundation [is] being reinforced by right wingers on social media…”

    .
    Since Saba Naqvi deliberately persisted with her argument that Raza Academy is a non-entity, it is reasonable to expect that she was sleeping through when India’s national newspapers carried photographs and reports on their front pages in August 2012 when this Islamist group caused violence in Mumbai in which two people were killed, nearly four-dozen policemen were wounded, and media vans and public properties worth lakhs were damaged.

    .

    If we were to believe her, Saba Naqvi is also unaware that a fine of Rs 2.74 crore was imposed on Raza Academy and like-minded group Madinatul Uloom Foundation for damage to public property. The fine came up before the High Court and was widely reported by newspapers.

    .

    Someone said that ignorance is bliss, but pretending to be ignorant can be murderous. There are three possibilities of Saba Naqvi’s line of argument.

    .

    One, she is genuinely not reading the country’s newspapers. Two, honesty is no longer a creed of Indian journalism.Three, liberalism prevents her from seeing realities on the ground.

    .

    In the current weather pattern, liberalism is the colour opposite of saffron – that is, for the time being.Most probably, it is the third argument that holds true for Saba Naqvi. George Orwell, speaking of liberal journalists, wrote in the Preface to his Animal Farm:

    .

    “One cannot expect intelligent criticism or even, in many cases, plain honesty from liberal writers and journalists who are under no direct pressure to falsify their own opinions.”

    .

    The violence of August 2012 is not an exception.

    Saeed Noori and other leaders of Raza Academy have decided to use the political tool of fatwa to threaten law-abiding citizens, demand apologies and make a fanatical religious points. In 2012,Saeed Noori announced a reward of Rs. 1 lakh for anyone who attacked Salman Rushdie with a slipper during his visit to the Jaipur Literary Festival.

    The reference to “slipper” was a hint; the goal was for the Barelvi followers to kill Rushdie in Jaipur.

    One does not know if Saba Naqvi, of Outlook magazine fame reads The Times of India, which in an editorialised comment on 17 January 2012 stated:

    “Rushdie’s decision to not attend the Jaipur Literary Festival sends out all the wrong signals. It would appear the government failed to reassure the Indian-born author that he need have no fears about visiting the land of his birth… The result is the impression that India is a soft state which succumbs easily to pressure.”

    To advance their murderous creed, Islamist groups like Raza Academy dig up the Rushdie issue several decades after his book, The Satanic Verses, was banned by the secular government of Rajiv Gandhi. Saba Naqvi claims she has not “heard” of them!

    In recent years, Raza Academy has routinely organised protests and threatened fatwas against law-abiding individuals and groups. It acts as India’s self-appointed policeman out to implement what it deems fit. It organised protests against liberal Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasreen.

    .

    In December 2013, its leader Saeed Noori was felicitated during Urs in the town of Bareilly for getting a police case registered against Taslima Nasreen filed by Hasan Raza Khan, a Barelvi cleric.

    .

    According to a 30 December 2013 media report, Noori’s uncle Tauqeer Raza Khan, the chief of Ittehad-e-Millat Council (IMC), had announced a reward of Rs. 5 lakh on Taslima Nasreen’s head.

    .

    So, how insignificant really is Raza Academy?

    .
    Raza Academy, founded by Saeed Noori in 1978, belongs to the Barelvi school of Sunni Islam. The Barelvi school originated from Islamic theologian Ahmed Raza Khan (14 June 1856 – 28 October 1921). This school of clerics holds views exactly similar to the Islamic State (ISIS) jihadists who attacked the French magazine Charlie Hebdo. Much like ISIS and Al-Qaeda, the Barelvi clerics consider Shias as infidels.

    .

    Given that Saba Naqvihas reported from northern India, she would be familiar with the Barelvi movement–of which Raza Academy is just one institution. The Barelvi-controlled institutions are present across Indian towns and villages, and in dozens of countries.The Barelvi movement is also represented by Dawat-i-Islami, whose member Malik Mumtaz Qadri assassinated Salman Taseer, the liberal governor of Pakistan’s Punjab province, in January 2011 for advocating reforms in Islam’s blasphemy laws. Barelvi clerics including Tahir-ul-Qadri have refrained from condemning the Barelvi assassin.

    .

    In a report dated 12 August 2012, journalist Reetika Subramanian wrote that Raza Academy has set up 32 centres across India. As per Subramanian’s report, Raza Academy uses text messages, Facebook posts and emails to organise protests.

    .

    Raza Academy is just one network of numerous Barelvi institutions across the world. Since these institutions originated from the town of Bareilly in Uttar Pradesh and are geographically close to Saba Naqvi, she understands their growing influence in our religious and public life.

    .

    Raza Academy and its brother institutions are present in numerous countries: Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, the UK, the United States, South Africa, Mauritius, Spain, Holland and others.

    .

    Perhaps Saba Naqvi is unaware of Raza Academy’s international clout but to pretend and persist that it is a non-entity in India flies in the face of evidence which Swapan Dasgupta reminded her and which she proceeded to disregard.

    .

    .

    Liberal-leftist writers, living in leafy apartments and travelling in air-conditioned cars, often fail to comprehend ground realities. It is relevant that Saba Naqvi is not a Sunni, which means that she can probably not grasp the vast influence Barelvi clerics have on the majority Sunni Muslims.

    .

    And since Saba Naqvi is not in the path of harm from Raza Academy-like Islamists, she finds them to be non-entities and is willing to disregard the fact that they are taking the nation’s rule of law in their own hands. The wickedness is also the idea that Islamists are acceptable in our social midst.

    .

    From her Twitter timeline, it appears Saba Naqvi was criticised for being a Shia in the wake of her recent piece on Saudi Arabia. She tweeted on 17 September: “Post [the] piece on Saudi Arabia [I am] being told I am Shia first.”

    .
    Swiss psychologist Carl Jung wrote, “The human mind carefully refrains from looking into itself.” Since her last name declares loudly that she is a Shia (and this is not her fault), it becomes relevant for intellectual discussion if she is indeed criticising the Sunni Saudis because she is a Shia, or she would also criticise the Shia Iran – possibly for beheading numerous Iranians in public square, much like the ISIS beheads humans publicly. Iran has executed about 700 people this year alone.

    .

    Somewhat in this context, journalist Bret Stephens wrote recently: “Liberal democracies that fail to educate the public about the institutions, methods and values by which they are sustained put themselves at risk.”

    .

    Our youths should safeguard the Indian Republic by speaking out against extremists of all varieties. Journalists must annihilate extremist Muslim leaders with the same intellectual ease with which they butcher the “extremist” Hindus.

    .

    However, the Amartya Sen Model of Intellectual Semi-literacy requires that its members speak, rightly, from rooftops when a fringe extremist Hindu issues a statement, but support the Islamists like Raza Academy in numerous ways: by avoiding a direct comment, by ignoring them altogether, by paying lip service, by presenting them as non-entities, by going into lengthy discussions of how these groups are small and irrelevant, or to put it simply, by tolerating the mainstreaming of the so-called fringe Islamists.

  • Kaal

    Dear Commis, and supporters of commies, name one institution, just one that you people nurtured, built (not infecting already existing ones with taxpayers money) in/for India..

  • Fingolfin

    HP
    .
    Well the incident with Irfan Habib took place in the late 50’s so Nehru was already disenchanted with China, Russia and communism before the armed Chinee invasion.
    .
    You generally chose people who agree with your broad view and it is no surprise that Mahalanobis was picked.
    .
    Here is a somewhat contrarian view of what happened to the economy under Nehru’s aegis. Like I said, to many, it all depends on where you come from.
    .
    “As the maxim “the proof of the pudding lies in the eating” must apply most closely to matters economic, the Nehru-Mahalanobis strategy can be considered only as good as its outcome. It had aimed to raise the rate of growth of the economy. With the distance that half a century affords us and the aid of superior statistical methods, we are now in the position to see that its early success was nothing short of spectacular. Depending upon your source, per capita income in India had either declined or stagnated during the period 1900-47. Over 1950-65, its growth was approximately 1.7 per cent. India’s economy, which was no more than a colonial enclave for more than two centuries, had been quickened. It is made out that this quickening achieved in the 1950s was no great shakes as the initial level of income was low and a given increase in it would register a higher rate of growth than at a later stage in the progression. This confounds statistical description with economic assessment. It is a widely recognised feature of economic growth that every increase in wealth makes the next step that much easier to take due to increasing returns to scale. The principle works both ways, rendering the revival of an economy trapped at a low level of income that much more difficult. It is worth stating in the context that the acceleration of growth achieved in the 1950s has not been exceeded since. Also, that India grew faster than China in the Nehru era.”
    http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/lead/the-economic-consequences-of-nehru/article6503716.ece
    .
    By the way, Indians were offered an alternative to Nehru that many believe was everything that Nehru should have done with the economy -Rajaji. He formed the Swatantra Party and all he promised free market as well as an end to the license Raj. However the people of India did not vote for that model. Nehru did not promise anything different in his elections speeches to the people so I don’t think too much blame can be placed on his doorstep in terms of the vision he pursued when an alternative was available and not taken.

  • HP

    Fingolfin,
    .
    The only useful information I could glean from that paragraph is that over 1950-65, India’s growth was approximately 1.7 per cent. That’s it, 1.7 percent. “Growing faster than China” of course, but China under the “visionary” leadership of Chairman Mao is a pretty low bar to cross, isn’t it? Compare if we must but with Japan, who, by the late 1960s, had risen from the ashes of World War II to achieve an astoundingly rapid and complete economic recovery. The period leading up to the late 1960s saw the greatest years of prosperity Japan had seen. By the 1960s, Japan’s economy was growing at an average of 10%.
    .
    Makes one wonder may be we would have been better off being a vassal state of Japan rather than a vassal of Soviet Russia. 🙂

  • keval

    All quotes attributed to Jinnah can be called as fake since he kept changing his positions to suit those whom he wanted as collaborators in creating the islamic paradise of Pakistan.
    The man himself was a fake, a megalomaniac, a glorifier of a primitive arrogant arab religion, follower of a history-narrative that eulogized islam and fooled muslims and non-muslims and even himself.

  • bjk

    And he also drank like a fish!

  • Fingolfin

    HP
    .
    If you read the article, it explains this right after that statistic.
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    “ndia’s economy, which was no more than a colonial enclave for more than two centuries, had been quickened. It is made out that this quickening achieved in the 1950s was no great shakes as the initial level of income was low and a given increase in it would register a higher rate of growth than at a later stage in the progression. This confounds statistical description with economic assessment. It is a widely recognised feature of economic growth that every increase in wealth makes the next step that much easier to take due to increasing returns to scale. The principle works both ways, rendering the revival of an economy trapped at a low level of income that much more difficult.”
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    To me that makes good sense. With no infrastructure in place and pitiable education levels of 30%, expecting high growth is foolishness. We just did not have the basics in place. We were a COLONY. From that point onward, we saw steady growth at a time when the word was far less interconnected and all economies grew domestically. India still is a domestic economy to large extent but with a MUCH larger middle and upper middle class that India did not have the buying power of in the 50’s.