Articles Comments

Pak Tea House » Entries tagged with "History"

Bhutto’s legacy

Bhutto’s legacy

By Saad Hafiz Thirty-six years have passed since Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, Pakistan’s first elected prime minister, was executed by a military dictatorship on April 4, 1979. However, Bhutto’s legacy and significance in the country’s troubled political history remain the focus of heated debate even today. His passionate supporters remember him as the populist reformer and spellbinding orator who restored national pride after a humiliating defeat by the Indian army in 1971, the man who returned Pakistan … Read entire article »

Filed under: Constitution, Democracy, History, liberal Pakistan, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Parliament, People's Pakistan, Politics

A future foretold

A future foretold

By Saad Hafiz Another Pakistan Day or Pakistan Resolution Day has come and gone, this time with a grand military parade put off for several years due to terrorism fears. On March 23, 1940, the All-India Muslim League moved a resolution in its annual session in Lahore that demanded autonomous states for the Muslims of British India. This resolution was a change in strategy from the Muslim League’s earlier demand for constitutional guarantees for Muslims in … Read entire article »

Filed under: History, Pakistan

بھٹو کا فلسفہ کیا تھا؟

بھٹو کا فلسفہ کیا تھا؟

ملک عمید مبشر اکرام کی جانب سے یہ فکر انگیز ٹویٹز یہاں درج کی جارہی ہیں جن میں انہوں نے پیپلز پارٹی کی جانب سے بار بار دہرائے جانے والے نعرے “بھٹو کا فلسفہ” کے تضادات دکھائے ہیں۔ بھٹو مرحوم کا فلسفہ کیا تھا؟ کل کے ایک ٹویٹری لیکچر کے بعد کا ایک جینوئن سوال ہے — Mubashir Akram (@mkw72) April 5, 2015 بھٹو کو کل زندہ تو کروا دیا آج کہاں ہیں مرحوم؟ — Mubashir Akram (@mkw72) April 5, 2015 بھٹو … Read entire article »

Filed under: minorities, Parliament, People's Pakistan, Twitter, Urdu

The Parallel Universe: Do We Live in World # 1?

Misbah U. Azam, Ph.D. Driving on the express way, we come across different exits which we may or may not take, depending upon the destination requirements, traffic densities, breaks for food, gas or other human needs. Now let us consider a scenario. You are driving on the road and there was an exit. You are debating whether to go out on it and stop by some restaurant to eat or for a cup of coffee or tea. Due to some deliberation you decide to keep driving for some more time before taking a break for coffee. After some time you drive, you see a car which overtook you minutes ago gets into an accident. You stop your car, come out and call the emergency. Then you approach the wrecked car and … Read entire article »

Filed under: India, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Partition, Society

The Unpredictables – Part V – 1980s: The Asian Cricket Tigers Take on the World, Episode 1

The Unpredictables – Part V – 1980s: The Asian Cricket Tigers Take on the World, Episode 1

By Fazal Abbas   Pakistan as a country has been through a number of highs and lows since traumatic partition in 1947 and its cricket has followed the similar pattern, showing how this sport is embedded in social, political and cultural facets of the country. Initially dispersed, unrecognised, underfunded and weak, Pakistan’s cricket team grew to become a major force in world cricket. If cricket is known for its glorious uncertainties, Pakistan team is even more renowned … Read entire article »

Filed under: Cricket, Egalitarian Pakistan, History, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Photos, sport, video

The Real Picture: Innovation, Technology and Pakistan

The Real Picture: Innovation, Technology and Pakistan

By Azka Naeem If all the brouhaha is to be believed, we’re looking at a failed state with nothing to offer. But is that really the case? Innovation is fundamentally characterised by what can be called ‘newness’, but a field does not have to be completely novel itself for innovation to take place. By that same token, an idea can be born and take root anywhere and at any time. In the politically unstable and consistently maligned Pakistan … Read entire article »

Filed under: Citizens, Education, Egalitarian Pakistan, liberal Pakistan, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Physics, Reviews, Science, youth

The Unpredictables Part III – 1960s: The Lost Decade (1961 – 1970)

The Unpredictables Part III – 1960s: The Lost Decade (1961 – 1970)

By Fazal Abbas   Pakistan as a country has been through a number of highs and lows since traumatic partition in 1947 and its cricket has followed the similar pattern in direct proportion, showing how this sport is embedded in social, political and cultural facets of the country. Initially dispersed, unrecognised, underfunded and weak, Pakistan’s cricket team grew to become a major force in world cricket. If cricket is known for its glorious uncertainties, Pakistan team … Read entire article »

Filed under: Cricket

The Unpredictables: Part I – 1940s: Partition and Foundation Stones of Cricket in Pakistan (1947 – 1950)

The Unpredictables: Part I – 1940s: Partition and Foundation Stones of Cricket in Pakistan (1947 – 1950)

By Fazal Abbas The eternal drama of Pakistan cricket never ceases to fascinate the fans of Cricket game. Why would it? There are only few teams in world cricket, rather world sports, as unpredictable and mercurial as Pakistan. They will be a laughing stock one day with their amateur performance and next day exhibit flamboyant performance with ability to beat best in the world. If not for Pakistani cricket team, cricket would have been the most … Read entire article »

Filed under: Colonialism, Cricket, History, Images, Lahore, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Punjab, secular Pakistan, south asia, sport

فیض احمد فیض کی شاعری کی کتابوں کی اشاعت کے مختلف دلچسپ مرحلے

فیض احمد فیض کی شاعری کی کتابوں کی اشاعت کے مختلف دلچسپ مرحلے

ضیاکھوکھر 1۔ میری معلومات کے مطابق فیض احمد فیض کی شاعری کا اولین مجموعہ’’ نقشِ فریادی‘‘ مکتبہ اُردو لاہورنے1941ء میں شائع کیا تھا۔ اس کے بعد دسمبر 1952ء میں جناب رؤف ملک نے ’’دستِ صبا‘‘ پیپلزپبلشنگ ہاؤس لاہور کے زیرِ اہتمام شائع کی تھی ان دنوں فیض صاحب حیدرآباد جیل میں تھے۔ پاکستان میں کسی کتاب کی رونمائی کی اولین تقریب ’’دستِ صبا‘‘ کے پبلشر رؤف ملک (پیپلز پبلشنگ ہاؤس) نے ’’دست صبا‘‘ کے حوالے سے … Read entire article »

Filed under: Benazir Bhutto, Books, culture, Democracy, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, History, Liberal Democratic Pakistan, Literature, poetry, Writers

After the Army’s public statement, the crisis deepens

After the Army’s public statement, the crisis deepens

As the Political crisis in Pakistan deepens after Army’s statement, Raza Rumi gives his analysis on the situation that how Nawaz Sharif got into this mess. [View the story “After the Army’s public statement, the crisis deepens” on Storify] … Read entire article »

Filed under: Army, Constitution, Democracy, History, human rights, Islamabad, journalism, Media, movements, Opinion, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Parliament, Punjab, Raza Rumi, Storify, Twitter

Dharna Duet not for Democracy says Nasim Zehra

Dharna Duet not for Democracy says Nasim Zehra

Malik Omaid “Nasim Zehra’s excellent tweets on the partisan role of (some) media & the complex web of forces & interests at work. History repeating itself.” Raza Rumi     [View the story “Dharna Duet not for Democracy says Nasim Zehra” on Storify] … Read entire article »

Filed under: Activism, Army, Citizens, Constitution, Corruption, Democracy, Elections, human rights, Islamabad, journalism, Justice, Lahore, Liberal Democratic Pakistan, Media, movements, Opinion, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Parliament, Politics, Raza Rumi, Revolution, Storify, Twitter

Jinnah and the Shahidganj dispute: “Give me more Gokhales”

Jinnah and the Shahidganj dispute: “Give me more Gokhales”

Independence Day special By Yasser Latif Hamdani Jinnah’s role as the main leader of the Pakistan Movement 1940 onwards has overshadowed his other numerous contributions to India in the independence struggle and as a mediator between communities.  Jinnah, who even the mid 1930s, was denounced as “more Congress than Congress” on numerous occasions intervened in inter-communal disputes and resolved them, which tragically have been forgotten because of the partisan approach to the India’s partition.  Indians have since … Read entire article »

Filed under: History, Jinnah

Who is the father of Pakistan’s Nuclear Program? Exposing Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan’s fraud

Who is the father of Pakistan’s Nuclear Program?  Exposing Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan’s fraud

  By Yasser Latif Hamdani We champion Baba-e-Bum Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan, a fraud and a quack scientist, as the father of the nuclear bomb. Can he really be called the “father of the Islamic Bomb” as some wish to call him?  In order to be the metaphorical father or mother of some idea or achievement, one should be deemed to play a central role in it so much so that if the said “father” or “mother” was … Read entire article »

Filed under: Pakistan

Tackling TTP, Lessons from History

by Fazal Abbas How should we tackle the menace of terrorism plaguing ‘The Land of Pure’? Confusion surrounds us when we try to look for an answer to it. First we have un-ending list of conspiracy theories of Taliban being Indian, American and Israeli agents. Then we have mainstream right wing parties i.e. Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz (PMLN), Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf (PTI) and Jamat-e-Islami (JI) who are ardent supporters of negotiating with the terrorists and going to extent of even providing offices to them. On the other hand we have mainstream left wing parties i.e. Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP), Awami National Party (ANP) and Mutahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) who have historically supported operations against terrorists but exhibiting confused politics on the issue for last one year or so. Although a firm understanding of the … Read entire article »

Filed under: Drones, human rights, ISI, Pakistan, Politics, Taliban, Terrorism, violence

A Dysfunctional State

by Saad Hafiz Pakistan’s societal, economic and political travails place it in a category of deeply dysfunctional and nearly ungovernable states. Generally speaking, dysfunctional states exhibit high degrees of institutional inconsistency, social malaise, ideological confusion, political malfunction and national paranoia. As a consequence, such states are unable to leverage their people’s histories and traditions to construct effective formal institutions with wide legitimacy; nor can they draw on the social capital embedded in cohesive groups to facilitate economic, political, and social intercourse; neither are they able to employ the established governing capacities of their citizens to run the affairs of state. Moreover, national development is much dependent upon the quality of a nation’s human capital. Dysfunctional states do not invest in human capital—such as better schools and hospitals. They tend to discourage people … Read entire article »

Filed under: Economy, Egalitarian Pakistan, liberal Pakistan, Pakistan, Society