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The Unpredictables Part III – 1960s: The Lost Decade (1961 – 1970)

The Unpredictables Part III – 1960s: The Lost Decade (1961 – 1970)

By Fazal Abbas   Pakistan as a country has been through a number of highs and lows since traumatic partition in 1947 and its cricket has followed the similar pattern in direct proportion, showing how this sport is embedded in social, political and cultural facets of the country. Initially dispersed, unrecognised, underfunded and weak, Pakistan’s cricket team grew to become a major force in world cricket. If cricket is known for its glorious uncertainties, Pakistan team … Read entire article »

Filed under: Cricket

The Unpredictables: Part I – 1940s: Partition and Foundation Stones of Cricket in Pakistan (1947 – 1950)

The Unpredictables: Part I – 1940s: Partition and Foundation Stones of Cricket in Pakistan (1947 – 1950)

By Fazal Abbas The eternal drama of Pakistan cricket never ceases to fascinate the fans of Cricket game. Why would it? There are only few teams in world cricket, rather world sports, as unpredictable and mercurial as Pakistan. They will be a laughing stock one day with their amateur performance and next day exhibit flamboyant performance with ability to beat best in the world. If not for Pakistani cricket team, cricket would have been the most … Read entire article »

Filed under: Colonialism, Cricket, History, Images, Lahore, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Punjab, secular Pakistan, south asia, sport

فیض احمد فیض کی شاعری کی کتابوں کی اشاعت کے مختلف دلچسپ مرحلے

فیض احمد فیض کی شاعری کی کتابوں کی اشاعت کے مختلف دلچسپ مرحلے

ضیاکھوکھر 1۔ میری معلومات کے مطابق فیض احمد فیض کی شاعری کا اولین مجموعہ’’ نقشِ فریادی‘‘ مکتبہ اُردو لاہورنے1941ء میں شائع کیا تھا۔ اس کے بعد دسمبر 1952ء میں جناب رؤف ملک نے ’’دستِ صبا‘‘ پیپلزپبلشنگ ہاؤس لاہور کے زیرِ اہتمام شائع کی تھی ان دنوں فیض صاحب حیدرآباد جیل میں تھے۔ پاکستان میں کسی کتاب کی رونمائی کی اولین تقریب ’’دستِ صبا‘‘ کے پبلشر رؤف ملک (پیپلز پبلشنگ ہاؤس) نے ’’دست صبا‘‘ کے حوالے سے … Read entire article »

Filed under: Benazir Bhutto, Books, culture, Democracy, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, History, Liberal Democratic Pakistan, Literature, poetry, Writers

After the Army’s public statement, the crisis deepens

After the Army’s public statement, the crisis deepens

As the Political crisis in Pakistan deepens after Army’s statement, Raza Rumi gives his analysis on the situation that how Nawaz Sharif got into this mess. [View the story "After the Army’s public statement, the crisis deepens" on Storify] … Read entire article »

Filed under: Army, Constitution, Democracy, History, human rights, Islamabad, journalism, Media, movements, Opinion, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Parliament, Punjab, Raza Rumi, Storify, Twitter

Dharna Duet not for Democracy says Nasim Zehra

Dharna Duet not for Democracy says Nasim Zehra

Malik Omaid “Nasim Zehra’s excellent tweets on the partisan role of (some) media & the complex web of forces & interests at work. History repeating itself.” Raza Rumi     [View the story "Dharna Duet not for Democracy says Nasim Zehra" on Storify] … Read entire article »

Filed under: Activism, Army, Citizens, Constitution, Corruption, Democracy, Elections, human rights, Islamabad, journalism, Justice, Lahore, Liberal Democratic Pakistan, Media, movements, Opinion, Pak Tea House, Pakistan, Parliament, Politics, Raza Rumi, Revolution, Storify, Twitter

Jinnah and the Shahidganj dispute: “Give me more Gokhales”

Jinnah and the Shahidganj dispute: “Give me more Gokhales”

Independence Day special By Yasser Latif Hamdani Jinnah’s role as the main leader of the Pakistan Movement 1940 onwards has overshadowed his other numerous contributions to India in the independence struggle and as a mediator between communities.  Jinnah, who even the mid 1930s, was denounced as “more Congress than Congress” on numerous occasions intervened in inter-communal disputes and resolved them, which tragically have been forgotten because of the partisan approach to the India’s partition.  Indians have since … Read entire article »

Filed under: History, Jinnah

Who is the father of Pakistan’s Nuclear Program? Exposing Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan’s fraud

Who is the father of Pakistan’s Nuclear Program?  Exposing Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan’s fraud

  By Yasser Latif Hamdani We champion Baba-e-Bum Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan, a fraud and a quack scientist, as the father of the nuclear bomb. Can he really be called the “father of the Islamic Bomb” as some wish to call him?  In order to be the metaphorical father or mother of some idea or achievement, one should be deemed to play a central role in it so much so that if the said “father” or “mother” was … Read entire article »

Filed under: Pakistan

Tackling TTP, Lessons from History

by Fazal Abbas How should we tackle the menace of terrorism plaguing ‘The Land of Pure’? Confusion surrounds us when we try to look for an answer to it. First we have un-ending list of conspiracy theories of Taliban being Indian, American and Israeli agents. Then we have mainstream right wing parties i.e. Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz (PMLN), Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf (PTI) and Jamat-e-Islami (JI) who are ardent supporters of negotiating with the terrorists and going to extent of even providing offices to them. On the other hand we have mainstream left wing parties i.e. Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP), Awami National Party (ANP) and Mutahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) who have historically supported operations against terrorists but exhibiting confused politics on the issue for last one year or so. Although a firm understanding of the … Read entire article »

Filed under: Drones, human rights, ISI, Pakistan, Politics, Taliban, Terrorism, violence

A Dysfunctional State

by Saad Hafiz Pakistan’s societal, economic and political travails place it in a category of deeply dysfunctional and nearly ungovernable states. Generally speaking, dysfunctional states exhibit high degrees of institutional inconsistency, social malaise, ideological confusion, political malfunction and national paranoia. As a consequence, such states are unable to leverage their people’s histories and traditions to construct effective formal institutions with wide legitimacy; nor can they draw on the social capital embedded in cohesive groups to facilitate economic, political, and social intercourse; neither are they able to employ the established governing capacities of their citizens to run the affairs of state. Moreover, national development is much dependent upon the quality of a nation’s human capital. Dysfunctional states do not invest in human capital—such as better schools and hospitals. They tend to discourage people … Read entire article »

Filed under: Economy, Egalitarian Pakistan, liberal Pakistan, Pakistan, Society

Iqbal’s Poetic Expression

Eminent historian Ramachandra Guha shares with us Iqbal’s poetic reflections as he looks into his 1910 Diary. [View the story "Iqbal's Poetic Expressions" on Storify] … Read entire article »

Filed under: Books, History, Literature, Pak Tea House, poetry, Writers

Pothowar — A Land of Forgotten History

Pothowar — A Land of Forgotten History

By Umair Tariq Punjab as we already know is comprised of Eastern Foothills of Himalayas, Pothohar Plateau and Upper Indus Valley. Whereas the most of our history has been brushed into the carpet by dictator Zia’s regime, the most misunderstood region of Punjab remained Pothohar Plateau. Usually the history of Pothohar Plateau is started from Mahmud of Ghazni who used traversed through it to invade Eastern Hindustan and to Sher Shah Suri who was also an … Read entire article »

Filed under: Architecture, Arts and Crafts

A State in Search of a Nation!

A State in Search of a Nation!

By Saad Hafiz Pakistan’s main ideological foundations were based on a separate nationhood, culture and civilisation identified by Islam. The founding fathers envisaged Pakistan as one unified, centralised nation, with one religion, one people and one language. What began as an obvious attempt to use the emotional attachment of the Muslim masses to religion also became the building block of Pakistani nationalism. What followed was the disconnect of nationalism from modernity, a failed project of a consensual … Read entire article »

Filed under: Democracy, History

Splitting Errors I

Splitting Errors I

By Yasser Latif Hamdani (This article is the first in a series of articles which will address the issues raised by Dr. Ishtiaq Ahmed in his eight part series in The Friday Times. This rebuttal series has been written exclusively for the PakTeaHouse. Please credit PTH for any republication.) Dr Ishtiaq Ahmed’s series “Splitting India” was fraught with historical inaccuracies and misconceived straw man fallacies some of which I will attempt to show in a series of … Read entire article »

Filed under: History, India, Jinnah, Pakistan, Partition

Pakistan Needs to Tell The Story Right

By Shaheera Syed It is a battle for ideas, narratives and tales. Get your story straight. Get your story right. Even if halfway through you realize that you have chosen the wrong side or perhaps the less profitable one, don’t panic. All is not lost. Get up, brush yourself off and get your act together. Be better prepared and equipped to make a come-back that flashes through the dust of time. Present a story that sticks, a narrative that gels well with the stakeholders, and a tale that grapples the audience. Anything ranging from a heart wrenching confession from the past to an optimistic commitment for the future would work to excuse your behavior. The trick is to make it convincing to a level that the audience is completely and utterly drunk … Read entire article »

Filed under: Drones, FATA, History, Identity, Islamism, Jinnah, liberal Pakistan, Pakistan, secular Pakistan

A Distortion of History?

By Umair Tariq Recently I came across an essay written by renowned historian William Dalrymple – best known in Pakistan for his famous work ‘The Last Mughal’ – examining the current Afghanistan situation within a historical context. Reading the essay pained me greatly for it was like looking at a burlesque fantasy where the author conveniently distorted facts and mingled them with his love for the Indian establishment and Hamid Karzai. The essay – if not completely then partially—is murder of historical accounts and acute distortion of facts that quite unworthy of a reputable international historian like Dalrymple. Dalrymple grossly misinterpreted history and twisted it in favor of Hamid Karzai, all the while overlooking the drastic mismanagement, corruption and acute embezzlement in Karzai’s government. It starts with Dalrymple pointing the barrels of … Read entire article »

Filed under: Afghanistan, Pakistan